The Vietnam War and the End of ‘American Exceptionalism’

Sponsored by the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Program of the Collaborative for Educational Services, Professor Chris Appy examines “American exceptionalism” as a core tenet of national identity, and how the Vietnam War posed fundamental challenges to the faith in America’s actions as a force for good in the world.

Winged Words

One chapter in the history of a Homeric simile

Jessica Wolfe, professor of comparative literature, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, presents an informal talk, “Winged Words: one chapter in the history of a Homeric Trope.”

Islamophobia

Racism, Surveillance, and Empire

In response to the events of 9/11, the Bush administration launched a “war on terror” ushering in an era of anti-Muslim racism, or Islamophobia. However, […]

Strange Bedfellows

How Corporate-Run NGOS, Middle Class Maya and Persistent Peasants are Changing the Face of Indigenous Politics in Yucatan

Fernando Armstrong-Fumero speaks about “Strange Bedfellows: How Corporate-Run NGOS, Middle Class Maya and Persistent Peasants are Changing the Face of Indigenous Politics in Yucatan.”

Putting Hypersexuality to Work

Black Women and Illicit Eroticism in Pornography

Mireille Miller-Young, is an associate professor in the Department of Feminist Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Viking Fighting Methods: Lecture and Demonstration

As part of the UMass Amherst Scandinavian Impulses series on Vengeance and Violence in Scandinavian Life and Culture, Dr. William R. Short, a research fellow at Higgins Armory Museum, in Worcester, MA, reviews the weapons of the Viking age and discusses his recent research on the fighting moves of Viking-age warriors.