Immigration

5 Facts To Know About Migrant Family Reunification

A federal court in San Diego has given the government until July 26 to reunite thousands of children with their parents. It has been a chaotic, much disputed process, but a process that is undeniably underway. Here are five questions about family reunification answered: 1. When did family separations start? Most reporting on this issue trace family separations back to the announcement in early May of a new "zero tolerance policy" at the U.S.-Mexico border. At the time of the announcement,...

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Regional News

A cup of coffee.
Julius Schorzman / Creative Commons

Seeking Personal Data, Cafe Lures College Students With Free Beverages

A Japanese company is developing a novel way to connect college students to corporate recruiters: offer free coffee at its cafes in exchange for giving up some personal information.

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Summer Fiction Series

A Miami traffic jam.
B137 / Creative Commons

Summer Fiction: ‘The World Is A Narrow Bridge’ By Aaron Thier

In most road-trip novels, characters walk or drive or sail as they look for answers to sometimes unanswerable questions.

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A new report from the Office of the Vermont State Auditor says it's nearly impossible to quantify the impact of Vermont's business incentive programs.

People looking to get a job at MGM Springfield use the computer to match their skills to potential jobs, during a career fair in October 2014.
Mark M. Murray / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

MGM officials told Massachusetts gambling regulators Thursday that the company is on pace to hire 3,000 employees before it opens its Springfield casino next month. But so far, MGM is coming up short on some hiring goals.

Massachusetts House Revisits Old Laws To Protect Reproductive Rights

Jul 19, 2018
Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives Robert DeLeo talking to the press after state lawmakers sent Gov. Charlie Baker legislation eliminating old abortion and contraception laws.
Chris Triunfo / State House News Service

After warning that shifts on the U.S. Supreme Court could put reproductive rights at risk in Massachusetts, state lawmakers on Thursday morning sent to legislation to Gov. Charlie Baker’s desk that would eliminate old state laws dealing with abortion and contraception, including a mid-1800s law banning all abortion and a ban on contraception for unmarried couples.

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Massachusetts

Immigrant Advocates Call The State's Budget 'A Big Win' For Gov. Baker -- But Not For Immigrants

After months of organizing rallies and lobbying legislators, immigration rights advocates were hopeful their efforts would lead to legislation that would protect immigrants in the state. Just last month, a large group of protesters stormed Gov. Charlie Bakers office, demanding that he sign off on the so-called Safe Communities amendment and threatening to vote him out of office if he refused. But the House and Senate failed to reach a consensus on the amendment, keeping it out of the...

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Immigration

5 Facts To Know About Migrant Family Reunification

A federal court in San Diego has given the government until July 26 to reunite thousands of children with their parents. It has been a chaotic, much disputed process, but a process that is undeniably underway. Here are five questions about family reunification answered: 1. When did family separations start? Most reporting on this issue trace family separations back to the announcement in early May of a new "zero tolerance policy" at the U.S.-Mexico border. At the time of the announcement,...

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Food Access

Fresh produce at Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington.
Eric Hunt / Creative Commons

Low-Income Access To Fresh Produce In Massachusetts Snarled In Tech Problem

Update on July 20, 2018: A temporary solution will allow food stamp recipients to keep using SNAP benefits at farmers markets and food stands through the end of August. The funding comes from the National Association of Farmers Market Nutrition Programs. Our original reporting is below. Now that summer is in full swing and farmers markets are abundant with fresh, local produce, the technology that enables people to use food stamps to buy that food faces a major snag.

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Labor

Behind The Campaign To Get Teachers To Leave Their Unions

Rachael McRae, a fifth-grade teacher in central Illinois, was sitting on the couch the other day with her 4-month-old when she saw the email. "He was having a fussy day," she says, "so I was bouncing him in one arm, and started going through my emails on my phone, just to feel like I was getting something done." In her spam folder, she found an email from an organization called My Pay, My Say, urging her to drop her union membership. Last month, the Supreme Court in Janus v. AFCSME dealt a...

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Climate Change

Rising Seas Could Cause Problems For Internet Infrastructure

The dense network of cables that make up the Internet is likely to be inundated with saltwater as sea levels rise, a new analysis suggests, putting thousands of miles of critical infrastructure along U.S. coastlines underwater in the next 15 years. "It is actually the wires and the hardware that make the Internet run," explains Ramakrishnan Durairajan , a computer scientist at the University of Oregon and an author of the research. The analysis estimates under the most severe model for sea...

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From Legislation to Legalization

Learn about the local impacts of the cannabis industry.

Award Winning Newsroom

NEPR Has Won Three First-Place PRNDI Awards

Winning First Place in Best Commentary, Best Interview and Best Soft Feature

In Contrast

THE ENDURANCE OF THE UNCANNY

Ilan Stavans in conversation with Carmen Maria Machado

Valley Voices Podcast

We’re back with a brand new Valley Voices podcast!

Episode #15 explores the theme of "Silver Lining".

Tanglewood

The Summer Tradition Continues

New England Public Radio brings listeners music from Tanglewood, the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s summer home in Lenox, Massachusetts every weekend of the season.

Media Lab Podcast

What Makes Us Stronger

Episode 11 of Media Lab explores real-life challenges in college, relationships and choices.

Presto!

Carolyn Kuan on Presto!

Morning Classical Music host, John Nowacki, talks with Carolyn Kuan, Music Director of Hartford Symphony Orchestra.

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A scene from a May 2017 event on Route 116 Vietnam Veterans Memorial Bridge between Holyoke and South Hadley, Massachusetts.
MassDOT / Public domain

Push For Transportation Funding In Massachusetts Includes Local Tax Option

There’s a last-minute push on Beacon Hill to allow local communities in Massachusetts to vote on new regional taxes to pay for their own transportation projects, an option available in most other states.

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