News

Construction of the MGM casino in Springfield, Mass., as of Oct. 2016.
Don Treeger / The Republican

New legislation allowing Massachusetts casinos to serve alcohol until 4 a.m. gives them a competitive advantage over gambling facilities in several neighboring states.

With approval from regulators, the Bay State could allow casinos to serve booze several hours later than any other New England state with legal gambling.

Casinos in Connecticut and Rhode Island must stop selling alcohol at 2 a.m. on weekends, and 1 a.m. during the week. In Maine, they can serve until 1 a.m.

People playing the slot machines at the Plainridge Park Casino
Don Treeger / The Republican

As some high profile Massachusetts politicians criticize recent legislation that paves the way for casinos in the commonwealth to serve alcohol until 4 a.m., elected officials in communities where resort casinos will operate are generally supportive of the law.

The change allows the Massachusetts Gaming Commission to issue liquor licenses allowing casinos to serve alcohol to people gambling on casino floors until 4 a.m. The new time, which amounts to a two-hour extension, was included in the state budget Governor Charlie Baker signed into law.

Gov. Baker signs fiscal 2016 budget on July 17, 2015.
Antonio Caban / State House News Service

State lawmakers will be taking a closer look at the line-item vetoes made last week by Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker before he signed the state's overdue $40.2 billion budget into law. A lot of the $320 million in vetoes stem from cuts Governor Baker made to MassHealth, in the hopes of getting his full package of healthcare reforms enacted.

Diahann Carroll, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington in Paris Blues
Herman Leonard / Morrison Hotel Gallery

Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington recorded only one album together, and it was a long time in coming.  The Great Summit was made for Roulette Records in 1961, long after these two giants of jazz had come to prominence in the twenties, and several years after George Avakian proposed such a meeting for Columbia Records in 1955.

Tertulia Colby Singleton, Program Director of Holyoke Urban Bike School
Raquel Obregon / NEPR

Colby Singleton, Program Director of Holyoke Urban Bike School at the YMCA in Holyoke, joined host Raquel Obergon on Tertulia. 

A PVTA bus.
Mark M. Murray / The Republican

Our panel of journalists looks at the big stories in the news.

What made The Short List this week?

Massachusetts Congressman Richard E. Neal.
File Photo / The Republican

Two Massachusetts Congressmen remain supportive of a bill that would impose criminal penalties on Americans who support a boycott of Israel, despite concerns raised by the American Civil Liberties Union.

US Representatives Joe Kennedy III and Richard E. Neal said in statements Friday that they still support the bill known as the Anti-Israel Boycott Act. Both congressmen cosponsor the bill, along with 238 other House members.

Bella Merlin and Deaon Griffin-Pressley, in  the production of Cymbeline.
Stratton McCrady / Shakespeare & Co.

NEPR News Now is a collection of recent features, interviews and commentaries.

James Carse, at his home in Rowe, Mass.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

The next book in our summer fiction series took Rowe, Massachusetts, author James Carse five years to create, from start "to publish."

In his whodunit novel "PhDeath: The Puzzler Murders," the perp creates puzzles, and a group of academics solves them to learn the identity of the victim.

Lionel Hampton, Chuck Green, Sandman Sims, and Bunny Briggs in No Maps on My Taps
George T. Nierenberg

 

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