Money Woes Drove Santorum From GOP Race, He Says

In his first interview since dropping his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination, Rick Santorum said that losing the Wisconsin primary on April 3 sealed his fate.

“We really felt we had to win in Wisconsin to do well in Pennsylvania” later in the month, he told the Family Research Council’s Tony Perkins in a radio interview Thursday.

The campaign for the first time, he said, had taken on debt. And after he lost Wisconsin to Mitt Romney in a close race, “we basically raised no money.”

“Money isn’t everything in politics,” the former Pennsylvania senator said, “but you do have to have enough” to mount an effort.

After Wisconsin, Santorum said he faced a race in his home state where Romney had already committed to spending millions in advertising and “we were not going to be able to spend a penny.”

Prompted by Perkins, Santorum said that his grassroots, small-donor campaign dispelled the “idea that value voters don’t matter.”

He also suggested that most Americans underestimate the role the media plays in defining campaign narratives.

“The media does drive this more than anyone realizes,” he said, adding that Romney was able to “spin the narrative” better than Santorum’s forces.

When the dominant story became “when are you getting out?” Santorum said, “it became a very, very tough environment.”

Santorum said he plans to work to elect conservatives throughout the country in the coming months.

“We are not going to go quietly,” he said. “We are not going away.”

Santorum didn’t mention the hospitalization last weekend of his youngest child, Bella, 3, as a factor in his departure from the race.

And Santorum wasn’t asked, nor did he offer an opinion, about when or whether he would endorse Romney, though the affirmation is expected.

Audio of the interview should be available later on the Family Research Council’s radio website.

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