Boston Marathon Explosions: Thursday’s Developments

Throughout the day, we’ll be updating with the latest news about the two explosions Monday near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The blasts killed three people and injured around 180. We’ll also be publishing related posts as the day continues. (See this note about how we cover events such as this.)

7:30 a.m. ET. Where Things Stand.

INVESTIGATION: Authorities have reviewed video of a man setting down a bag and leaving the scene, but that does not necessarily make him a suspect. “We need more than that,” a source with knowledge of the investigation has told NPR’s Tom Gjelten.

While there has been no arrest as of this hour, The Boston Globe says authorities believe they are ” ‘very close’ in their pursuit of the bomber,” according to “an official briefed on the investigation … who declined to be named.”

FBI investigators have said that the key clue to finding who’s responsible will likely come from a photo or video taken by a spectator. At the website of the FBI’s Boston bureau, officials have posted this appeal for help: “If you have any information that could be of assistance, please call 1-800-CALL-FBI (prompt #3). No detail is too small.”

EMERGENCY DECLARATION: “President Obama has signed an emergency declaration for the state of Massachusetts — a move that frees up federal funding to help with crisis management,” WBUR writes.

INTERFAITH SERVICE: The public is invited to an Interfaith service Thursday morning at Boston’s Cathedral of the Holy Cross, WBUR reports. President Obama, who will speak, is set to attend with first lady Michelle Obama. Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee and a former governor of Massachusetts, is also expected to be there. The service is due to begn at 11 a.m. ET.

NPR’s Jeff Brady rounded up the latest news earlier Thursday on Morning Edition.

For more:

Wednesday’s Developments.

Tuesday’s Developments.

NPR’s Coverage.

WBUR’s Coverage.

Note: As happens when stories such as this are developing, there will likely be reports that turn out to be mistaken. Wednesday, for example, there were reports from CNN, the AP, WBUR and others that authorities either had arrested a suspect or were about to do that. It turned out that no one had been arrested or taken into custody.

We will focus on news being reported by NPR, other news outlets with expertise, and statements from authorities who are in a position to know what’s going on. And if some of that information turns out to be wrong, we’ll update.


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