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Londonderry, New Hampshire, submitted a bid to Amazon for its second headquarters that challenges its neighbor, Massachusetts.
State of New Hampshire / nheconomy.com

In their attempt to lure Amazon and its 50,000 jobs, New Hampshire officials are making one fact quite clear about the Granite State: It's not Massachusetts.

In this episode of In Contrast, Ilan Stavans talks with Wesley Lowery, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist for the Washington Post. Lowery was the lead reporter for the Post’s Fatal Force, a project that tracked over 900 police shootings in 2015. He’s the author of They Can’t Kill Us All: Ferguson, Baltimore and a New Era in America’s Racial Justice Movement.

State Sen. Eric Lesser, from Longmeadow, Mass.
Nik Nadeau / Creative Commons

Massachusetts State Sen. Eric Lesser's bid to get an official state study of the prospect of linking Boston and Springfield with high-speed rail service will get a hearing before the Transportation Committee next week.

Liza Voll Photography / BOSTON LYRIC OPERA

Boston Lyric Opera opened its 2017-2018 with a terrific production of Puccini's Tosca at the Cutler Majestic Theatre in Boston.

On July 18, 1967, Richard Wilbur was invited to give a poetry reading as part of the Summer Arts Festival at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. 

Dave Ratner of the Springfield-based Dave's Soda and Pet City in a file photo.
John Suchocki / The Republican

A western Massachusetts business owner faces a boycott of his stores after attending an event with President Trump last week. But he says he's being unfairly targeted.

Massachusetts State House.
AlexiusHoratius / Creative Commons

Before the end of the month, leaders in the Massachusetts Senate are hoping to pass sweeping changes to the state's criminal justice laws. 

Amazon headquarters in Seattle, Washington.
Kiewic / Creative Commons

Amazon is looking for a location for a second national headquarters, which could could mean 50,000 high-paying jobs. Bids from interested cities are due Thursday.

"Horton Hears a Who!" by Dr. Seuss.
CCAC North Library / Creative Commons

Our panel of journalists looks at the big stories in the news. 

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