Adam Frenier

Berkshire County Reporter

Adam is based at New England Public Radio’'s Berkshire County news bureau in Pittsfield, where he has been since August, 2015. He joined NEPR as a freelance reporter and fill-in operations assistant during the summer of 2011. For more than 15 years, Adam has had a number stops throughout his broadcast career, including as a news reporter and anchor, sports host and play-by-play announcer as well as a producer and technician.

Adam graduated from UMass Amherst in 2004 with a B.A. in History.

Ways to Connect

Berkshire Bank offices in downtown Pittsfield.
Adam Frenier / NEPR

News this week that Berkshire Bank plans to move its headquarters from Pittsfield to Boston caught some local officials by surprise. But they're hoping the bank's move could still end up being a positive for Berkshire County and its largest city.

Eastbound state route 57 entering Sandisfield, Mass.
John Phelan / Creative Commons

Federal regulators have brushed off a request by both Massachusetts U.S. senators to delay construction of a natural gas pipeline running through Otis State Forest in southern Berkshire County.

Berkshire Bank offices in downtown Pittsfield.
Adam Frenier / NEPR

Berkshire Bank says its planned move to Boston will have little impact on workers at its current headquarters in Pittsfield.

The move to Boston is largely driven by Berkshire's planned acquisition of Commerce Bank, which has 19 branches in central and eastern Massachusetts.

Sean Gray, chief operating officer of Berkshire Bank, said there will be no job losses in Pittsfield and the city will remain an operational center for the bank.

He said moving its headquarters to Boston will get executives closer to regulators, lawmakers and the financial hub of the region.

Marijuana activists celebrated outside the Mass. State House on Dec. 15, 2016, the first day pot became legal in the Bay State. Here, Ellen Brown holds a handful of pot.
Gintautas Dumcius / MassLive

Our panel of journalists looks at the big stories in the news.

What made The Short List this week?

A person wearing a Confederate flag jacket, outside Easthampton High School on May 3, 2017.
Submitted Photo / NEPR

Our panel of journalists looks at the big stories in the news.

What made The Short List this week?

Pipeline protesters and their supporters outside of Southern Berkshire District Court in Great Barrington, Mass. after a hearing on May 11, 2017.
Adam Frenier / NEPR

Seventeen protesters arrested at the construction site of a natural gas pipeline in southern Berkshire county appeared in court Thursday in Great Barrington. And prosecutors tossed them a curveball.

Blandford Ski Area in Blandford, Mass.
Dave Roback / The Republican

The future appears uncertain for the Blandford Ski Area in western Hampden County. And the non-profit club that owns it is blaming Mother Nature for some of its woes.

In a statement, officials for Blandford Ski Area sAid they are exploring all options to stay open, but also concede that selling the property could be an option.

UMass Amherst denied Kalsang Nangpa's request to carry the Tibetan flag during a special part of the university's commencement ceremony.
Submitted Photo / Daily Hampshire Gazette

Our panel of journalists looks at the big stories in the news.

What made The Short List this week?

Protesters block access to Otis State Forest in Sandisfield, Mass. where a natural gas pipeline is being built.
Mary Serreze / MassLive

Eighteen demonstrators were arrested Tuesday in southern Berkshire County at the construction site of a natural gas pipeline in Otis State Forest.

State police say the protesters blocked access roads to the job site in an effort to keep construction workers away. Police spokesperson Dave Procopio said those arrested will be charged with trespassing.

Peter Ives gets his bike packed and ready to go on a eight day bike trip from Northampton to Washington DC, where his group will join the Peoples Climate March on April 29th, 2017.
Carol Lollis / Daily Hampshire Gazette

Activists will gather in Washington D.C. and locally on Saturday to protest President Trump's agenda on climate change and the environment.

Tom Crowe from Northampton is part of a group who spent eight days biking to Washington for the People's Climate March. He said peddling there is symbolic.

"The bicycle is one of the most fuel-efficient modes of transportation that humans have ever devised," Crowe said. "It only relies on carbohydrates. It doesn't need fossil fuels directly."

But Crowe said he'll be taking a bus back to western Mass.

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