Alden Bourne

reporter

Before joining New England Public Radio, Alden was a producer for the CBS NEWS program 60 Minutes. In that role, he covered  topics ranging from art, music and medicine to business, education, and politics. Working with correspondent Morley Safer, he reported from locations across the United States as well as from India, Costa Rica, Italy, and Iraq.  

Alden attended Boston College and received a B.S. in Economics. He later took a year away from CBS to participate in the Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellowship at the University of Michigan.

Alden was part of the 60 Minutes team that won a duPont-Columbia University Award for “60 Minutes: Punishing Saddam,” a report on the impact of U.N. sanctions on the children of Iraq. He was also honored for excellence in coverage of race and ethnicity by the Columbia University School of Journalism  for “Vice Versa,” a story on a white-only scholarship program at an historically black college in Alabama. Alden has been on staff at NEPR since May 2016.  

Ways to Connect

Don Treeger / The Republican

Earlier this week, a school librarian in Cambridge said she was returning ten Dr. Seuss books to Melania Trump. The first lady sent the books to schools across the country as part of National Read A Book Day.

File Photo / The Republican

On Tuesday, voters in Holyoke, Massachusetts, will narrow the field of candidates for mayor.

The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum in Springfield
Springfield Museums / via MassLive

Since it opened in June, the new Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum has attracted thousands of visitors to Springfield. It features murals and statues of some of the author's most famous characters, like Horton the Elephant and the Cat in the Hat.

The Hampden County Hall of Justice in downtown Springfield, which houses the Superior Court
Don Treeger / The Republican

For years, court reporters have only been serving in Massachusetts Superior Court, which hears felony criminal cases and high-dollar civil cases.

But a test of a new digital recording system is now complete, and state plans to use it instead of the reporters. 

"There will be full-time court reporters on staff through June of 2018," said Jon Williams, administrator for the Massachusetts trial court. "For the most serious felony cases, we will use court reporters that we hire on a daily basis."

A C-5M aircraft arrives for the 439th Airlift Wing at Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee.
Dave Roback / MassLive

Officials at Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee, Massachusetts, are studying the impact of the base on the surrounding area.

A school bus in Worcester.
File photo / MassLive

Updated at 10:00 a.m. on Aug. 29, 2017: A statement from the mayor's office Monday night said the union and bus company reached a 5-year deal, "with the goal of ratification by the union members on Wednesday night."

The union representing school bus drivers in Worcester had considered a strike starting Monday, the first day of school, but agreed to stay on the job for three more days while negotiations continue.

Two boys in Worcester watch the Aug. 21, 2017, solar eclipse.
Melissa Hanson / MassLive

During Monday's eclipse, the moon blocked out 65 to 68 percent of the sun in western Massachusetts, but a more dramatic eclipse is on the way.

Fred Venne is the director of the Bassett Planetarium at Amherst College.

"The eclipse that's happening in 2024 is going to more significant in this region," he said. "We'll be looking in the Amherst, Northampton, southern Vermont, northern Connecticut area at about close to 94, 95 percent coverage of the sun. And if you go up to Burlington, Vermont, it will be 100 percent."

The original monument honoring people of color from Worcester who served in World War II.
Courtesy / Thomas Doughton

A proposed memorial honoring World War II veterans is causing controversy. The dispute focuses on just who should be honored.

The memorial is designed to be an exact copy of one that was removed in 1959 to make way for a new highway. It honored black veterans who served in World War II, but only covers those who enlisted or were drafted through 1943.

Seven officers trained to join the new Worcester horse unit.
Scott J. Croteau / MassLive

It's been a little over two months since the Worcester police introduced officers on horseback. There are four horses and seven officers in the new mounted unit.

They've been patrolling parks, the Worcester Common and across the city. Police Chief Steven Sargent said they're also sent out to a neighborhood after a report of a shooting.

Sun Kim at her resturant, Sun Kim Bop, in downtown Springfield
Alden Bourne / NEPR

Two western Massachusetts residents of South Korean descent have been watching as tensions between the United States and North Korea have continued to escalate. 

Suk Massey is a lecturer in east Asian languages and literature at Smith College. She said Friday she's been following the exchanges between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un closely.

"I'm worrying about it but most friends in Korea don't seem to worry about that too much, because they are somehow -- they are used to it," she said.

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