Alden Bourne

reporter

Before joining New England Public Radio, Alden was a producer for the CBS NEWS program 60 Minutes. In that role, he covered  topics ranging from art, music and medicine to business, education, and politics. Working with correspondent Morley Safer, he reported from locations across the United States as well as from India, Costa Rica, Italy, and Iraq.  

Alden attended Boston College and received a B.S. in Economics. He later took a year away from CBS to participate in the Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellowship at the University of Michigan.

Alden was part of the 60 Minutes team that won a duPont-Columbia University Award for “60 Minutes: Punishing Saddam,” a report on the impact of U.N. sanctions on the children of Iraq. He was also honored for excellence in coverage of race and ethnicity by the Columbia University School of Journalism  for “Vice Versa,” a story on a white-only scholarship program at an historically black college in Alabama. Alden has been on staff at NEPR since May 2016.  

Ways to Connect

Opioids
Hailey R. Staker / U.S. Air Force

Pittsfield, Sturbridge, West Springfield, Palmer, and Charlton are among the cities and towns in central and western Massachusetts that are taking legal action against manufacturers and distributors of opioids.

Water running from a faucet.
Skitterphoto / Creative Commons

The city of Westfield, Massachusetts, has filed a lawsuit against three companies after chemical contaminants were found in two of its wells.

Sarah Robertson / Daily Hampshire Gazette

A pair of state lawmakers from western Massachusetts say they're calling it quits at the end of this term.

MassMutual's offices in Enfield, Connecticut, which will close as part of an expansion in Massachusetts.
Don Treeger / The Republican

A town official in Enfield, Connecticut, said he was surprised by the news its largest taxpayer will be leaving, but is confident another corporation will take its place.

Massachusetts state Senator Stanley Rosenberg in a file photo.
Kristin LaFratta / MassLive / masslive.com/photos

A Democratic candidate for Massachusetts governor has called on the former state Senate President Stan Rosenberg to resign from the legislature.

Okane Hall at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts.
Paul Keleher / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/pkeleher

The board of trustees for the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, met Feb. 3 and decided that the school mascot will continue to be the crusader.

The Massachusetts Statehouse in Boston.
AlexiusHoratius / Creative Commons

There's a shortage of attorneys willing to take child welfare cases in western Massachusetts, and state legislators are trying to address the issue. 

A Hadley, Massachusetts, police car.
file photo / Masslive

A grand jury has indicted a Hadley, Massachusetts, policeman after the U.S. Department of Justice accused him of using excessive force when he broke a man's nose.

A rifle with a bump stock, which will soon be illegal to own in Massachusetts.
WASR / Creative Commons

Under a new law, Massachusetts gun owners have until Wednesday, Jan. 31 to relinquish bump stocks, which allow rifles to be fired more rapidly.

A new survey shows that eighth grade students in Springfield, Massachusetts, are more likely to feel hopeless than their counterparts in the rest of the state.

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