Britta Greene

Britta is NHPR's reporter in the Monadnock Region and Upper Valley. 

Speaking at the U.S. District Court in Concord on Thursday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a surge in federal enforcement efforts around synthetic opioids. 

Public health officials are urging use of bug repellent this season as cases of tick and mosquito-borne disease are on the rise.

The insects have been expanding their range across the U.S., including here in the Northeast, and a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a significant increase in reported infections.

Buyouts and cost-cutting in recent months at Keene State College have put the school on track to balance its budget for the coming fiscal year, according to Interim President Melinda Treadwell.

These found skis are decades old, of varying brands and sizes. Some are in better shape than others.
Britta Greene / NHPR

Rory Gawler bought a big, old farmhouse in Lebanon, New Hampshire about seven or eight years ago. It has beautiful views of the Mascoma River Valley and a little orchard in the backyard.

Governor Chris Sununu and Vermont Governor Phil Scott signed a joint letter to House and Senate leadership Monday, calling on Congress to increase funding for fighting and preventing forest fires.

“This is far from just a ‘Western’ issue,” they wrote, arguing the Forest Service is increasingly allocating its funds to fight fires at the expense of other priorities.

Dr. Anna Konopka’s medical office sits just across the driveway from her house, tucked along the shore of Pleasant Lake in New London. There’s no cell service, no wifi. Her phone rings off the hook.

At 85, she’s set to close her practice Friday, but the move is not voluntary. She says she’s being forced to shut down by a system that no longer values the type of patient-centered medicine that she practices.  

The New Hampshire Board of Medicine has a different take. They’re challenging her medical decision-making and other fundamental aspects of her work.

Inside Daddypops Tumble Inn Diner in Claremont, the owner’s daughter – Fallon Carter – is working behind the counter as she talks with her mom and a friend.

They’re discussing a recent incident in town that’s been all over the news. The family of a young biracial boy says local teenagers intentionally hanged their son in a lynching-style attack. He survived, but had to be airlifted to the hospital.

The parents of a teenager involved in the alleged attack of a young boy in Claremont say the incident was an accident, and was not racially motivated.

Their son was just joking around, they told Newsweek in an interview. He saw the boy standing on the picnic table and thought he'd scare him from behind, they said. He did not know there was a rope around the boy's neck. The kids had been playing with the rope and climbing trees, the parents explained.

About 100 people gathered in a park  in downtown Claremont Tuesday night for a vigil in response to an alleged attack of an eight year-old biracial boy in the city.

At the event, it didn’t take long before racial tensions were on full display. Organizer Rebecca MacKenzie was introducing the night's first speaker when she was interrupted by a white man, driving by and and yelling from his truck.


Claremont City Manager Ryan McNutt and Police Chief Mark Chase will attend a community event Tuesday night aimed at responding to the alleged race-based attack of a young biracial boy in town, McNutt said.