Carrie Healy

Morning Edition Host/Reporter

Before coming to New England Public Radio, Carrie worked in commercial radio for fifteen years, and for a handful of years in public access television.  In college, Carrie studied early American History and earned her B.A. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.  She has been working at NEPR long enough to have fond memories of editing sound on reel-to-reel tape with a razor blade. In 1996 Carrie contributed original research on 18th century holiday revelry in Deerfield, MA, to Stephen Nissenbaum’s book The Battle For Christmas.  When she's not working, Carrie enjoys tending her flock of sheep, playing the board game Labyrinth, and preparing recipes from her cookbook collection.

Inside the Massachusetts Statehouse.
Brian Moen / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/emoeby

Invigorated and recharged from a quiet week on Beacon Hill last week, Massachusetts lawmakers are returning for budget debates. 

Hats and signs that were left at the pop-up memorial for the Boston Marathon bombing are arranged on tables at the Boston City Archives.
Elizabeth Gillis / WBUR

Last week ended before the Massachusetts Senate could move on the supplemental budget bill. One program suspended on Sunday, because the bill wasn't passed, is the Healthy Incentives Program, which needed more funding in order to continue to offer the bonus fruits and veggies to snap recipients through June 30. 

The Ramsdell Public Library in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, on August 17, 2007.
Paul Geffen / Creative Commons / https://goo.gl/WrfyV4

It's budgeting season in communities across New England. And it happens to be National Library Week. Terry Cowgill of the Berkshire Edge wrote about what he calls "the budget cutting ritual" in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Libraries and budget cuts often go together.

Massachusetts state Senator Karen Spilka, center, speaking on March 22, 2018.
File photo / State House News Service

Monday is the 99th day of 2018. We're anticipating a transfer of leadership in the Massachusetts Senate on July 23, the 204th day of the year.

The Massachusetts Statehouse in Boston.
Jesse Costa / WBUR

Last week, Bryon Hefner -- Massachusetts state Senator Stan Rosenberg’s estranged husband -- was indicted by a state grand jury on felony charges connected with sexual assaults, criminal lewdness and the distribution of nude photos.

Singer songwriter Abe Loomis plays his guitar in a sound isolating recording booth in a studio in Conway, Massachusetts.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

Abe Loomis of Conway, Massachusetts, says he feels deeply connected to western Massachusetts and to the Berkshires. 

Massachusetts state Senator Karen Spilka, center, speaking on March 22, 2018.
File photo / State House News Service

 

Last week, state Senator Karen Spilka announced that she had amassed enough support to become the next Massachusetts Senate President. 

Massachusetts House Speaker Robert DeLeo.
Dave Roback / The Republican

Late last week, in remarks made to the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, House Speaker Bob DeLeo talked about the “Peter Kocot health care bill.” Kocot, who passed away last month, was chairman of the Massachusetts Joint Committee on Health Care Financing.

ISO New England's control room.
ISO New England

New England residents are charged some of the highest consumer rates for power in the country. This comes as the budget for the region's electric grid operator rose by more than 30 percent over five years.

Massachusetts Sen. Cynthia Creem (center) is the branch's new majority leader.
Sam Doran / State House News Service

With changes in place in Senate leadership, can we expect an overhaul to the criminal justice system to follow? Last week, Massachusetts Senate President Harriette Chandler named a new second in command, Sen. Cynthia Creem, a Democrat from Newton. Chandler previously held that position when Amherst's Stan Rosenberg was Senate president. 

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