Carrie Healy

Morning Edition Host/Reporter

Before coming to New England Public Radio, Carrie worked in commercial radio for fifteen years, and for a handful of years in public access television.  In college, Carrie studied early American History and earned her B.A. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.  She has been working at NEPR long enough to have fond memories of editing sound on reel-to-reel tape with a razor blade. In 1996 Carrie contributed original research on 18th century holiday revelry in Deerfield, MA, to Stephen Nissenbaum’s book The Battle For Christmas.  When she's not working, Carrie enjoys tending her flock of sheep, playing the board game Labyrinth, and preparing recipes from her cookbook collection.

August Thomas at the Montague Bookmill.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

Author August Thomas spent a lot of time working on her latest novel at the independent bookstore in Montague, Massachusetts, called The Bookmill -- so that's where we met to talk to kick off our summer fiction series.

A jar of marijuana buds for sale inside the River Rock dispensary in Denver, Colorado.
Steve Brown / WBUR

Many adults in Massachusetts supported the legalization of recreational marijuana. And it seems delayed.

Evacuees from Puerto Rico gather in Springfield, Massachusetts, on Thursday, April 19, 2018, facing a housing crisis.
Greg Saulmon / The Republican / MassLive.com/photos

Some families in New England who fled Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria nine months ago are still using housing vouchers from FEMA to pay for hotels. The voucher program ends on June 30.

A constitutional convention debates the so-called "millionaire's tax" on May 18, 2016.
Shira Schoenberg / The Republican

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court holds the fate of a roughly $2 billion tax proposal to fund transportation and education. 

Sol LeWitt's "Wall Drawing 867" installed at UConn in Storrs, Connecticut, pictured in October 2017.
Bethany / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/vedder

For the last 40 years or so, publicly-funded buildings in Connecticut were required by law to spend one percent of their total costs on art. 

Hampden County Sheriff Nick Cocchi in Springfield, Massachusetts.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

Western Massachusetts will soon have its own treatment facility for opioid addicts. The Stonybrook Stabilization and Treatment Centers will be in both Ludlow and Springfield. 

Author Tinky Weisblat prepares rhubarb brownies from the cookbook, "Love, Laughter, and Rhubarb."
Carrie Healy / NEPR

The humble rhubarb: when its green stalks transition to pink, it's springtime in New England. Author Tinky Weisblat has a new cookbook out, full of ways to prepare rhubarb that don't involve pie.

A 2007 photograph of the Celtics, playing in Boston.
Adam Pieniazek / Creative Commons / goo.gl/m8pZoF

Last week, prohibitions against sports gambling were removed by the U.S. Supreme Court. Some states are already jumping in. 

Massachusetts Secretary of State William Galvin in 2017.
Sam Doran / State House News Service

Massachusetts Secretary of State William Galvin's employees appear to have done some political work on state time. Facing criticism from his challengers, Galvin has launched an investigation.

The state Senate chamber in the Connecticut State Capitol.
Michelle Lee / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/michellerlee

Connecticut this week wrapped up its legislative session. An on-time bipartisan budget agreement marked a departure from last year.

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