Carrie Healy

Weekend Edition Host/Reporter

Before coming to New England Public Radio, Carrie worked in commercial radio for fifteen years, and for a handful of years in public access television.  In college, Carrie studied early American History and earned her B.A. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.  She has been working at NEPR long enough to have fond memories of editing sound on reel-to-reel tape with a razor blade. In 1996 Carrie contributed original research on 18th century holiday revelry in Deerfield, MA, to Stephen Nissenbaum’s book The Battle For Christmas.  When she's not working, Carrie enjoys tending her flock of sheep, playing the board game Labyrinth, and preparing recipes from her cookbook collection.

Raise Up Massachusetts
uusc4all / Creative Commons

Community organizations, labor groups and business leaders gather to testify at the Massachusetts Statehouse Tuesday for a legislative hearing on a number of bills that would gradually raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour.  

The Patriots' grand entrance to Super Bowl XLVI in 2012. They lost to the Giants.
SAB0TEUR / Creative Commons

After a horrific season opener, the New England Patriots are looking to get back on track this Sunday against the New Orleans Saints.

Dunkin' Donuts Park in Hartford, where the Yard Goats play.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

It's been quite a year for Hartford's minor league baseball team, after an inaugural season full of stadium blunders. Nonetheless, the Double-A Yard Goats wrap up their final home-stand of the season on Thursday. For the season, the Yard Goats have drawn nearly 400,000 in 2017 – the second best in the league. 

In a photo from April 2017, the Massachusetts Statehouse.
William Zhang / Creative Commons

A former Boston city councilor is offering a suggestion he says could help his city -- and Springfield.

Mike Ross wrote a column in Boston magazine saying Massachusetts should auction off its historic statehouse, so it could become condos. 

Over 10,000 people attended a counter-protest of the "Boston Free Speech" rally on the Boston Common on Saturday, August 19, 2017.
Dan Glaun / The Republican

On Saturday in Boston, tens of thousands of people gathered in a counter-protest to a planned "Free Speech" demonstration. Supporters of the conservative "Free Speech Rally" said, despite being outnumbered, their event was a success. The Free Speech keynote speaker was Dr. Shiva Ayyadurai, a Republican US Senate candidate.

As we do most Mondays, we turn to State House News Service reporter Matt Murphy for the details.

U.S. Rep. Nikki Tsongas addresses Massachusetts Democrats who gathered for the 2016 state party convention in Lowell.
Shannon Young / The Republican

At the end of last week, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker's administration rolled out out new rules on greenhouse gas emissions from the natural gas, transportation and electricity generation industries. The regulations call for a greenhouse gas reduction of 24 percent below 1990 emissions levels by 2020. 

Author David Hyde Costello with the clay models he referenced while illustrating his book "Little Pig Saves The Ship."
Carrie Healy / NEPR

"Little Pig Saves the Ship" is the next pick in our annual back-to-school book series.

A sign at All Power in Granby promotes the August 2012 Massachusetts sale tax holiday.
File photo / The Republican

Governor Charlie Baker filed tax holiday legislation, even though legislators have already recessed for the summer. So what's the likelihood of a sales tax-free weekend this month?

As we do most Mondays, we turn to State House News Service reporter Matt Murphy for some insight.

Gov. Baker signs fiscal 2016 budget on July 17, 2015.
Antonio Caban / State House News Service

State lawmakers will be taking a closer look at the line-item vetoes made last week by Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker before he signed the state's overdue $40.2 billion budget into law. A lot of the $320 million in vetoes stem from cuts Governor Baker made to MassHealth, in the hopes of getting his full package of healthcare reforms enacted.

James Carse, at his home in Rowe, Mass.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

The next book in our summer fiction series took Rowe, Massachusetts, author James Carse five years to create, from start "to publish."

In his whodunit novel "PhDeath: The Puzzler Murders," the perp creates puzzles, and a group of academics solves them to learn the identity of the victim.

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