Carrie Healy

Weekend Edition Host/Reporter

Before coming to New England Public Radio, Carrie worked in commercial radio for fifteen years, and for a handful of years in public access television.  In college, Carrie studied early American History and earned her B.A. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.  She has been working at NEPR long enough to have fond memories of editing sound on reel-to-reel tape with a razor blade. In 1996 Carrie contributed original research on 18th century holiday revelry in Deerfield, MA, to Stephen Nissenbaum’s book The Battle For Christmas.  When she's not working, Carrie enjoys tending her flock of sheep, playing the board game Labyrinth, and preparing recipes from her cookbook collection.

Gov. Baker signs fiscal 2016 budget on July 17, 2015.
Antonio Caban / State House News Service

State lawmakers will be taking a closer look at the line-item vetoes made last week by Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker before he signed the state's overdue $40.2 billion budget into law. A lot of the $320 million in vetoes stem from cuts Governor Baker made to MassHealth, in the hopes of getting his full package of healthcare reforms enacted.

James Carse, at his home in Rowe, Mass.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

The next book in our summer fiction series took Rowe, Massachusetts, author James Carse five years to create, from start "to publish."

In his whodunit novel "PhDeath: The Puzzler Murders," the perp creates puzzles, and a group of academics solves them to learn the identity of the victim.

 Immigration advocates, students and educators at a higher education hearing in Boston in 2015.
Antonio Caban / State House News Service

The Pioneer Valley Transit Authority could be announcing bus route cuts later this week. That's after the Transit Authority's state appropriation came in more than $1.5 million less than expected.

Protests are planned in response, and the Five Colleges -- which have pumped millions of dollars into the PVTA -- have warned the transit authority that they might seek bus services from another provider. All this is going on while the state budget is sitting on Governor Charlie Baker's desk.

A PVTA bus.
Mark M. Murray / The Republican

The Pioneer Valley Transit Authority has wrapped up a series of public hearings on proposed bus route cuts or service reductions. The PVTA Advisory Board is preparing to announce its final decisions next week, after hearing from outraged riders -- and area colleges.

Judge Kafker meets with members of the Governor's Council on July 15, 2015.
Antonio Caban / State House News Service

Last Friday, Massachusetts House and Senate leaders voted on a compromise version of the state budget that reduces spending by about $600 million in the new fiscal year.

Now that the budget has been passed along to the governor's desk -- is House Speaker Bob DeLeo allowing marijuana bill negotiators back to the table?  

Raise Up Massachusetts
uusc4all / Creative Commons

Lawmakers have had a busy few weeks on Beacon Hill  tying up loose ends and dealing with the budget and marijuana policy issues -- all leading up to the Fourth of July holiday. The session began slowly and quietly. That was underlined in a Boston Business Journal editorial last week about how activists sometimes threaten to launch a ballot initiative as a way to motivate lawmakers into action. 

Varieties of marijuana.
File photo / The Republican

The Massachusetts House had planned to vote last week on a bill making substantial changes to the voter-passed recreational marijuana law. But after quick objections to the bill -- and an issue with how it was written -- Speaker Bob Deleo delayed that vote.

Mike Kelly, head of archives and special collections at Amherst College, reads from the Melville Dewey archive.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

Summer begins next week, and so we'll be kicking off our Summer Fiction series. That's when New England Public Radio reporters interview local authors -- some of which have written so many books they can't remember how many.

State Senate President Stanley Rosenberg speaks with constituents during a meet-and-greet at Northampton Coffee on Thursday, September 10, 2015.
Laura Newberry / The Republican

In Massachusetts, there's continued uncertainty around money. A small legislative committee continues to whittle down the not-yet-passed budget that takes effect in three weeks.

Meanwhile, legislators are preparing for a constitutional convention on Wednesday. Massachusetts Senate President Stan Rosenberg said he sees one matter before lawmakers -- the so-called millionaires tax -- as a solution to the revenue issues.

A warning sign posted by opponents to a proposed toxic waste disposal site in the woods, near the Housatonic River  in Great Barrington, Mass.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

The Environmental Protection Agency's Appeals Board hears arguments Thursday on the second phase of cleaning up the Housatonic River in Berkshire County.

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