Carrie Healy

Weekend Edition Host/Reporter

Before coming to New England Public Radio, Carrie worked in commercial radio for fifteen years, and for a handful of years in public access television.  In college, Carrie studied early American History and earned her B.A. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.  She has been working at NEPR long enough to have fond memories of editing sound on reel-to-reel tape with a razor blade. In 1996 Carrie contributed original research on 18th century holiday revelry in Deerfield, MA, to Stephen Nissenbaum’s book The Battle For Christmas.  When she's not working, Carrie enjoys tending her flock of sheep, playing the board game Labyrinth, and preparing recipes from her cookbook collection.

A timber rattlesnake in Berkshire County, Masachusetts.
Patrick Randall / Creative Commons

Our panel of journalists looks at the big stories in the news.

What made The Short List this week?

A syringe.
ZaldyImg / Creative Commons

There's legal uncertainty at this hour about whether Arkansas will be allowed to go ahead with a pair of executions Thursday night. Eight executions had been scheduled to begin on Monday -- and there have been conflicting court decisions since then.

While this has been playing out in court, a western Massachusetts folk singer has been playing a song he wrote called "Eight Men Dying."

Tom Neilson of Greenfield, Mass., is on tour now. He said he played a few gigs in Arkansas earlier this month.

Health factor rankings, by county, in Massachusetts.
County Health Rankings 2017 / University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute

Hampden County finished at the bottom in a public health ranking, again this year.

The report, which is published by the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, ranks Hampden County 14th out of 14 Massachusetts counties in health factors -- like smoking and obesity -- and outcomes -- like premature death. 

Gov. Charlie Baker in November of 2016.
Sam Doran / State House News Service

The failure in Washington of GOP  healthcare legislation was welcome news to Governor Charlie Baker. The Bay State Republicans said the bill would've cost Massachusetts about $1 billion a year.

As we do most Mondays, we turn to Matt Murphy of the State House News Service for an update from Beacon Hill. Matt said that even with the failure of the federal legislation, Baker's healthcare headache remains.

The spread at a gathering of the cookbook club at the Stockbridge, Mass., public library.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

Reading groups, or book clubs, are a long-standing tradition at many local libraries. But there’s a new variety: cookbook clubs.

They're part book clubs, and part pot luck gatherings. Members pick one cookbook a month, claim recipes, and make the dishes. That’s all we needed to know, before deciding to visit a meeting of the Library Cookbook Club in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

via Flickr from Flickr user Robert Couse-Baker

The arrival of the Trump Administration in Washington brought with it a huge volume of phone calls and emails. Congressional offices have said they've never seen so much correspondence from constituents -- many who're opposed to President Trump's cabinet nominees and early policy announcements.

But new research finds this might not be the best way to influence your representatives -- at least in state legislatures.

Jewish Family Service's Springfield office.
Jewish Family Service

What made The Short List this week?

U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts reacts when the conversation turns to Senator Mitch McConnell during her annual Springfield Office Hours at City Stage, Monday, March 20, 2017, in Springfield, Mass.
Jessica Hill / The Republican

What made The Short List this week?

  • Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren sought assurance from U.S. Housing Secretary appointee Ben Carson that the Trump family would not financially benefit from HUD grants at his Confirmation Hearing this week. She wasn’t assured.
  • The state has a commission looking at time: getting rid of “springing forward” and “falling back.” Are there benefits?
  • And the panel looks at two stories that they believe flew under the radar this week.

GUESTS: