Carrie Healy

Morning Edition Host/Reporter

Before coming to New England Public Radio, Carrie worked in commercial radio for fifteen years, and for a handful of years in public access television.  In college, Carrie studied early American History and earned her B.A. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.  She has been working at NEPR long enough to have fond memories of editing sound on reel-to-reel tape with a razor blade. In 1996 Carrie contributed original research on 18th century holiday revelry in Deerfield, MA, to Stephen Nissenbaum’s book The Battle For Christmas.  When she's not working, Carrie enjoys tending her flock of sheep, playing the board game Labyrinth, and preparing recipes from her cookbook collection.

Author Tinky Weisblat prepares rhubarb brownies from the cookbook, "Love, Laughter, and Rhubarb."
Carrie Healy / NEPR

The humble rhubarb: when its green stalks transition to pink, it's springtime in New England. Author Tinky Weisblat has a new cookbook out, full of ways to prepare rhubarb that don't involve pie.

A 2007 photograph of the Celtics, playing in Boston.
Adam Pieniazek / Creative Commons / goo.gl/m8pZoF

Last week, prohibitions against sports gambling were removed by the U.S. Supreme Court. Some states are already jumping in. 

Massachusetts Secretary of State William Galvin in 2017.
Sam Doran / State House News Service

Massachusetts Secretary of State William Galvin's employees appear to have done some political work on state time. Facing criticism from his challengers, Galvin has launched an investigation.

The state Senate chamber in the Connecticut State Capitol.
Michelle Lee / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/michellerlee

Connecticut this week wrapped up its legislative session. An on-time bipartisan budget agreement marked a departure from last year.

In a file photo, Senate President Harriette Chandler reads a statement accepting the findings of the ethics investigation into Sen. Stanley Rosenberg.
Sam Doran / State House News Service

Last week saw the resignation of Massachusetts state Senator Stan Rosenberg, following the release of an ethics report that chastised the Amherst Democrat for a "failure of leadership." This week, the Senate tries to move on. 

Worcester Regional Airport, in 2014.
Terageorge / Creative Commons / commons.wikimedia.org

The Worcester Regional Airport will see JetBlue begin daily service on Thursday to New York's JFK Airport. And this fall, American Airlines will add a daily flight from Worcester to Philadelphia. 

Cash.
QuinceMedia / Creative Commons / quincemedia.com

The Massachusetts Senate passed their version of a midyear spending bill that included money for funding Regional Transit Authorities, money to reimburse school districts for educating special needs students, and more. 

Inside the Massachusetts Statehouse.
Brian Moen / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/emoeby

Invigorated and recharged from a quiet week on Beacon Hill last week, Massachusetts lawmakers are returning for budget debates. 

Hats and signs that were left at the pop-up memorial for the Boston Marathon bombing are arranged on tables at the Boston City Archives.
Elizabeth Gillis / WBUR

Last week ended before the Massachusetts Senate could move on the supplemental budget bill. One program suspended on Sunday, because the bill wasn't passed, is the Healthy Incentives Program, which needed more funding in order to continue to offer the bonus fruits and veggies to snap recipients through June 30. 

The Ramsdell Public Library in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, on August 17, 2007.
Paul Geffen / Creative Commons / https://goo.gl/WrfyV4

It's budgeting season in communities across New England. And it happens to be National Library Week. Terry Cowgill of the Berkshire Edge wrote about what he calls "the budget cutting ritual" in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Libraries and budget cuts often go together.

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