Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

Seddique Mateen, the father of the man behind the 2016 Pulse nightclub massacre, worked with the FBI as a confidential informant for more than a decade leading right up to the shooting, according to attorneys for the shooter's widow.

When Zachary Cruz was arrested for trespassing Monday at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the site where his brother allegedly murdered 17 people and injured dozens more last month, the Broward County Sheriff's Office initially set his bond at $25 — a common sum for suspects charged with misdemeanor trespass on school grounds, as Cruz was.

Former South Korean President Lee Myung-bak has been arrested over a host of corruption allegations, ranging from bribery to embezzlement and tax evasion. Live footage on local media showed Lee submitting to his arrest warrant at home late at night, getting into a black sedan flanked by two law enforcement officers.

Peruvian President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski announced Wednesday that he has offered his resignation to the country's congress, bowing to the mounting controversies that have been threatening his 19-month-old presidency. Kuczynski announced his decision in a nationally televised address just one day before a scheduled vote on his impeachment, his second in just a few months.

"I don't want my country, nor my family, to continue suffering through the uncertainty of recent times," he said.

The winners of the 2018 Whiting Awards don't have much of a track record. None on this list has the laundry list of accolades you may be accustomed to seeing for literary prize winners. Several don't even have a second book to their names.

But that's the idea here.

After more than a decade of silence, the Israeli Defense Forces confirmed Wednesday that an Israeli airstrike destroyed a suspected nuclear reactor under construction in Syria in 2007.

It was in the dark, early hours of Sept. 6, near Deir ez-Zor, that "four F-16 jets eliminated a nuclear threat not only to Israel, but to the entire region," the IDF said in a statement.

Scientific advancement: It's all in the wiggle.

The Russian Embassy in London drew an uncommon scene Tuesday, gathering crowds of people, vans and diplomatic cars at its gate even as the building saw the departure of a number of far more familiar faces: the 23 Russian diplomats expelled by the British government. Russia's state-run news agency, TASS, reports that the diplomats and their families departed the compound to the strains of a Russian patriotic march.

DeAndre Harris, a black man brutally beaten after a white nationalist rally last August in Charlottesville, Va., has been found not guilty of misdemeanor assault for his role in the incident. The city's General District Court handed down the ruling Friday.

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