Davis Dunavin

Davis Dunavin loves telling stories, whether on the radio or around the campfire. He fell in love with sound-rich radio storytelling while working as an assistant reporter at KBIA public radio in Columbia, Missouri. Before coming back to radio, he worked in digital journalism as the editor of Newtown Patch. As a freelance reporter, his work for WSHU aired nationally on NPR. Davis is a proud graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism; he started in Missouri and ended up in Connecticut, which, he'd like to point out, is the same geographic trajectory taken by Mark Twain.

Facebook’s plan to fight fake news may have a fatal flaw. That’s according to a Yale study on how people read and react to news on the social media platform.

Businessman Ned Lamont says he’s filing paperwork today in a bid for the Democratic nomination for governor of Connecticut.

A federal judge in New York says environmentalists can move ahead with a lawsuit against the federal government to stop the sale of Plum Island. Seven environmental groups, including Save the Sound, are suing the Department of Homeland Security and the General Services Administration. 

It’s been five years since the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. Catherine Violet Hubbard was one of 20 children killed, along with six educators. Her family has spent the past five years planning an animal sanctuary in her memory

Mark Barden lost his 6-year-old son, Daniel, in the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, which claimed the lives of 19 other children and six educators. After the shooting, Barden co-founded the advocacy group Sandy Hook Promise, which seeks to prevent gun-related deaths through gun violence prevention programs and policy change at the state and national levels.

This Thursday will mark five years since the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut that killed 20 children and six educators. Members of Connecticut’s U.S. congressional delegation will commemorate the date this week with a call for acts of kindness.

The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs has missed a deadline to approve or reject plans for a tribal casino in East Windsor, Connecticut. The casino would be jointly owned by the state’s two federally recognized Native American tribes. The tribes say this is not going to stop them from going ahead with their plans.

Nearly half of Connecticut’s high earners say they might leave the state in the next five years because of the state’s budget crisis and a ballooning cost of living. That’s according to a new survey from Sacred Heart University.

The painter Jasper Johns wants to leave a gift to the town of Sharon, Connecticut – his estate – to be used as an artists' retreat.

Insurance giant Aetna is in talks with several states to moves its headquarters out of Hartford, Connecticut, where it’s been since the 1800s.

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