Jill Kaufman

Senior Reporter/Producer

Jill has been reporting, producing features and commentaries, and hosting shows at NEPR since 2005. Before that she spent almost 10 years at WBUR in Boston, five of them producing PRI’s “The Connection”  with Christopher Lydon. In the months leading up to the 2000 primary in New Hampshire, Jill hosted NHPR’s daily talk show, and subsequently hosted NPR’s All Things Considered during the South Carolina Primary weekend. Right before coming to NEPR, Jill was an editor at PRI's The World, working with station based reporters on the international stories in their own domestic backyards. Getting people to tell her their stories, she says, never gets old.

Forest ecologist Christian Marks is dwarfed by one of the oldest elm trees in Massachusetts.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

There are thousands of Elm Streets in America, but not many surviving elms, for which the streets were named. Starting in the mid-20th century, Dutch elm disease killed off millions.

The emerald ash borer.
David Cappaert bugwood.org / Creative Commons

The destructive emerald ash borer is moving deeper into New England's tree population. An infestation was just found in Hampshire County in western Massachusetts.

The East Burke dam in Vermont.
Charlotte Albright / VPR

The Northeast has more than 200,000 dams and culverts, what U.S. Fish and Wildlife's Cathy Bozek described as "barriers to water flow." She said many of the dams no longer serve their original purpose, and many of the culverts need work. 

Robert Murphy, a judge in Springfield District Court.
File photo / The Republican

First up in our news roundup this week: The Massachusetts Senate early Friday morning passed sweeping criminal justice legislation. The bill's sponsor says it will reduce the rates of incarceration, while giving judges more leeway to set bail amounts and sentence offenders.

Government and nonprofit leaders in Holyoke, Mass., gathered to prepare for the expected arrival of people from Puerto Rico.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

After two devastating hurricanes in September, many Puerto Ricans are relocating to New England to stay with family or friends.

Lucio Perez, center, in a red jacket, is surrounded by local clergy in front of the First Congregational Church in Amherst, Massachusetts.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

A church in Amherst, Massachusetts, is allowing a Guatemalan man facing deportation to live in the building for the foreseeable future.

Wildfires in York County, Maine, October 1947.
Brick Store Museum

For some in New England, the deadly fires in California are a reminder of when fires overtook much of Maine around this time of year, 70 years ago. Wildfires in 1947 simultaneously burned over hundreds of miles for ten days, wiping out towns, and forever changing the landscape. 

Government and nonprofit leaders in Holyoke, Mass., gathered to prepare for the expected arrival of people from Puerto Rico.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

Holyoke was once a robust industrial city, like others along major U.S. rivers in the 19th and 20th centuries. Paper manufacturing was king here, and like other industrial cities Holyoke attracted waves of Irish, French Canadian, German, Polish and Italians immigrants to work in the mills.

A sign outside Enlace de Familia in Holyoke, Mass. on Thursday, September 28, 2017.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

An unknown number of Puerto Rican families may be heading toward the mainland U.S. in the coming weeks in the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Maria. They'll be in need of jobs, housing and health care, and western Massachusetts is getting ready.

Homes lay in ruin as seen from a U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Air and Marine Operations, Black Hawk during a flyover of Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria September 23, 2017.
Kris Grogan / U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Students, families and many school staff in Holyoke, Massachusetts, are still desperate for news from relatives in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria hit last week.

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