Jill Kaufman

Senior Reporter/Producer

Jill has been reporting, producing features and commentaries, and hosting shows at NEPR since 2005. Before that she spent almost 10 years at WBUR in Boston, five of them producing PRI’s “The Connection”  with Christopher Lydon. In the months leading up to the 2000 primary in New Hampshire, Jill hosted NHPR’s daily talk show, and subsequently hosted NPR’s All Things Considered during the South Carolina Primary weekend. Right before coming to NEPR, Jill was an editor at PRI's The World, working with station based reporters on the international stories in their own domestic backyards. Getting people to tell her their stories, she says, never gets old.

The activated sludge system, the "heart of the water treatment plant," at Springfield Water and Sewer, where wastewater is treated before going into the Connecticut River, in  2017.
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A draft water pollution permit for a regional wastewater treatment plant on the Connecticut River in Springfield, Massachusetts, is now back in the hands of the Environmental Protection Agency. 

San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz talks to about 250 people at Gateway City Arts in Holyoke, Massachusetts.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

Right after Time magazine named her one of the most influential people of 2018, San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz traveled to Holyoke, Massachusetts, a city some call Little Puerto Rico.

The Springfield, Mass., Police Department headquarters.
Unidentified staff photo / Springfield Republican

A federal investigation has been opened to review police practices in the former narcotics unit in Springfield, Massachusetts.  

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno in February 2018.
Dave Roback / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

Ever since a Springfield, Massachusetts, church opened its doors last month to an undocumented woman from Peru about to be deported, Mayor Domenic Sarno has been trying to shut it down. The First Amendment could ultimately block him.

The Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.
Adam Frenier / NEPR

We kick off with a decision from Massachusetts highest court this week in favor of the Berkshire Museum's sale of dozens of its art works, including at least one piece by Norman Rockwell. 

The Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Mass.
Berkshire Museum / Creative Commons

The Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, received approval from state's highest court Thursday for an agreement allowing it to sell up to 40 artworks. The decision clears the way for a contentious sale that will include some pieces by Norman Rockwell.

Springfield Building Commissioner Steve Desilets conducts an inspection of the living space at South Congregational Church on Thursday, April 5, 2018. Mayor Domenic Sarno called for the inspection.
Greg Saulmon / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

City officials said Thursday a Springfield, Massachusetts, church has passed an inspection for “minimum life safety and sanitary requirements.” A Peruvian woman facing deportation has been living there with her two American-born children. 

A special City Council meeting in Springfield, Massachusetts, would have centered around a vote that could bar city employees from interfering with a church's offering sanctuary to Gisella Collazo was postponed.
Don Treeger / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

The Springfield, Massachusetts, City Council on Thursday proposed an order that says no city employee should interfere with South Congregational Church in providing sanctuary to a woman from Peru. 

At town hall in Amherst, Mass., elections officials says the unofficial result is that a measure to change how the town is governed was approved Tuesday by voters
John Phelan / Creative Commons / commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Faolin42

The majority of residents in Amherst, Massachusetts, voted Tuesday to to put an end to their centuries-old Town Meeting and adopt a new form of government.

A winter storm hit Pittsfield, Massachusetts, in a file photo.
Adam Frenier / NEPR

After a succession of nor’easters and another big storm reportedly hitting New England today, some schools have had to close their doors more than the number of snow days allotted by state education officials. 

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