Nancy Eve Cohen

Reporter

Nancy Eve Cohen has worked in public radio for more than two decades.

She served as the environmental reporter for WNPR and the managing editor of the Northeast Environmental Hub. She has also covered breaking news including the shootings in Newtown and the tornado in Springfield for WBUR. For VPR she reported on the two-year recovery from the floods of Tropical Storm Irene in southern Vermont.

Early in her career, she was an editor at NPR in Washington DC.

Before radio, Nancy produced environmental documentaries for television. As part of a camera crew, she covered the war in Sarajevo, the early days of glasnost in Moscow, and in Cuba, a rare interview with Fidel Castro.

Nancy was named the Environmental Reporter of the Year by the Rivers Alliance of Connecticut. She contributed to VPR’s award-winning coverage of Tropical Storm Irene and Hurricane Sandy. Her work has garnered awards from American Women in Radio & Television, the CT Associated Press Broadcasters Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

Besides reporting, Nancy helps young people get started in the field. She has taught writing and journalism at Smith College, University of Hartford, UMass, Amherst and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts.

Ways to Connect

Shriners Hospital for Children in Springfield, Massachusetts.
Masslive / masslive.com/photos

Shriners Hospital for Children in Springfield, Massachusetts, is opening a new inpatient rehabilitation service that provides therapy for children recovering from complex injuries.

Congressman Richard Neal in Springfield, Massachusetts.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

Springfield Congressman Richard Neal is responding to President Trump's jab Thursday at Massachusetts U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren. Trump brought up Warren's claim of Native American ancestry and challenged her to take a DNA test. 

Marijuana.
futurefilmworks / Creative Commons

The state's Cannabis Control Commission has released the names of 11 companies that have applied to run marijuana businesses in nine communities in western Massachusetts. If licensed, the companies promise to bring tax revenue, jobs and other economic benefits to the cities and towns that host them.

A box of joints branded as Dogwalkers are sold at Rise, a marijuana medical dispensary in Amherst, Massachusetts.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

A day that many people have long pushed for in Massachusetts finally arrived. If you’re over 21 it’s legal, now, to buy marijuana in a store licensed by the state. But the illegal market isn’t expected to go away anytime soon.

Nurses on the picket line at Baystate Franklin Medical Center in Greenfield, Mass. during a one-day strike in June 2017.
Dave Roback / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

The Massachusetts Nurses Association and Baystate Franklin Medical Center have reached a settlement on a new contract.

An interfaith iftar, a breaking of the daily fast during Ramadan.
David Molnar / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

Ramadan started this week and many Muslims will refrain from eating or drinking during the day for 30 days, as a way to grow closer to God.

A stretch of the Housatonic River that under an EPA proposal would be dredged to remove PCBs.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

The New England EPA is suggesting mediation may help speed up the clean up of the Housatonic River. 

A blackjack game.
Images Money / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/59937401@N07

MGM is asking the Massachusetts Gaming Commission to help pay for Springfield-area residents to train as casino employees. The company has indicated it will hire more than 1,000 Springfield residents to work in the casino when it opens in September.

Michael Buoniconti, superintendent of the Mohawk Trail and Hawlemont Regional School Districts, stands out side the Mohawk Trail Regional Middle and High Schools in Shelburne, Massachusetts. A video camera monitors who wants to enter the school.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

Students across the country will walk out of class Wednesday morning to mark one month since the Parkland shooting, and to call for safer schools.

In the past decade, it’s become the norm for students to practice lockdowns to protect against an intruder with a gun. Now some western Massachusetts educators say they want to do more to secure their schools.

Scenes from a rally in Northampton, Mass., on Aug. 13, 2017, opposing white supremacists.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

Rallies sprang up around New England Sunday in solidarity with the anti-Nazi protestors in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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