Nancy Eve Cohen

Reporter

Nancy Eve Cohen has worked in public radio for more than two decades.

She served as the environmental reporter for WNPR and the managing editor of the Northeast Environmental Hub. She has also covered breaking news including the shootings in Newtown and the tornado in Springfield for WBUR. For VPR she reported on the two-year recovery from the floods of Tropical Storm Irene in southern Vermont.

Early in her career, she was an editor at NPR in Washington DC.

Before radio, Nancy produced environmental documentaries for television. As part of a camera crew, she covered the war in Sarajevo, the early days of glasnost in Moscow, and in Cuba, a rare interview with Fidel Castro.

Nancy was named the Environmental Reporter of the Year by the Rivers Alliance of Connecticut. She contributed to VPR’s award-winning coverage of Tropical Storm Irene and Hurricane Sandy. Her work has garnered awards from American Women in Radio & Television, the CT Associated Press Broadcasters Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

Besides reporting, Nancy helps young people get started in the field. She has taught writing and journalism at Smith College, University of Hartford, UMass, Amherst and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts.

Ways to Connect

A warning sign posted by opponents to a proposed toxic waste disposal site in the woods, near the Housatonic River  in Great Barrington, Mass.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

General Electric and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are battling over the last stretch of the PCB clean-up of the Housatonic River in Massachusetts from Pittsfield through Great Barrington.

GE is appealing the government’s clean-up plan, which is estimated to cost $613 million over 15 years. One big issue is where to put the toxic PCBs that are dug up from the river.

Millers River near Erving, Massachusetts
jkb / Creative Commons

Athol, Massachusetts, may soon build a handicapped accessible dock on the Millers River. It will allow people to paddle to an existing accessible dock, a little downstream.

The dock would enable people to move from a wheelchair to a kayak or canoe on the Millers River.

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