Sam Hudzik

News Director

Sam has overseen local news coverage on New England Public Radio since 2013.

Before joining NEPR, he held a few positions at WBEZ Chicago – political reporter, newscast editor and newscast producer. Prior to that, he covered local angles on the federal government from Washington, D.C. for public radio stations in Illinois and Indiana.

Sam is proud to have edited his colleagues’ stories, including those recognized by the Third Coast International Audio Festival, the AP Broadcast Association of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, the Radio Television Digital News Association’s Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, Public Radio News Directors, Inc. (PRNDI) and the Missouri Review’s Miller Audio Award. Sam’s reporting has been recognized by the Illinois AP Broadcasters Association and the Murrow Awards.

He graduated from George Washington University and grew up in Park Forest, Illinois, and is thankful for his time in 2012-13 as a Knight-Wallace journalism fellow at the University of Michigan.

Before realizing he ought to be a reporter, Sam worked at a political research firm and as an aide to U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell.

Ways to Connect

Bella Merlin and Deaon Griffin-Pressley, in  the production of Cymbeline.
Stratton McCrady / Shakespeare & Co.

NEPR News Now is a collection of recent features, interviews and commentaries.

Shelley MacInnes, holding pictures of her son, Alex Ciccolo, who faces domestic terrorism charges.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

NEPR News Now is a collection of recent features, interviews and commentaries.

Author Zane Kotker lives in Northampton, Mass.
Joyce Skowyra / NEPR

In Northampton, Massachusetts, writer Zane Kotker's latest book, three widows in their early 70s deal with loneliness, fear of death, a condo association and internet dating.

"Goodnight, Ladies" is a 111-page novella, and the latest pick in our summer fiction series. 

Massachusetts House Speaker Robert DeLeo.
Dave Roback / The Republican

It's going to be a busy week on Beacon Hill as Massachusetts lawmakers try to find common ground on some tough topics. The state's fiscal year ends Friday and there's no budget agreement yet. Also, the legislature is aiming to get a recreational marijuana law on the governor's desk this week. But big differences remain between the House and Senate bills, both of which make changes to the voter-passed marijuana law.

The Rev. Tom Gerstenlauer of South Congregational Church in Springfield, explains the sanctuary decision, on June 16, 2017.
Patrick Johnson / The Republican

The building code commissioner for Springfield, Mass., has sent a warning letter to a church that plans to become a sanctuary for immigrants facing deportation.

Varieties of marijuana.
File photo / The Republican

NEPR News Now is a collection of recent features, interviews and commentaries.

The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss opened June 3, 2017.
Springfield Museums / via MassLive

NEPR News Now is a collection of recent features, interviews and commentaries.

Then a U.S. senator from Massachusetts, Scott Brown visited Springfield on January 25, 2012.
Robert Rizzuto / The Republican

New Zealand's representative in New England said he's looking forward to working with the new U.S. Ambassador to his country -- former Massachusetts Senator Scott Brown.

MASS MoCA's exhibition space is doubling.
Jeremy Goodwin / NEPR

NEPR News Now is a collection of recent features, interviews and commentaries.

William Ryder, former owner and director of the now-closed Ryder Funeral Home in South Hadley, right, is handcuffed and led out of a courtroom at Hampshire Superior Court Nov. 18, 2017, after pleading guilty.
File Photo / Daily Hampshire Gazette

A Massachusetts court has accepted a nearly half-million dollar judgment against a former funeral home director in South Hadley.

William Ryder and the now-closed Ryder Funeral Home have agreed to pay $471,446 in restitution.

State Attorney General Maura Healey's office will manage that money, to compensate people who claim Ryder "misappropriated" money they prepaid for funeral arrangements.

It was nearly three years ago that a state inspector visited Ryder Funeral Home and found improperly stored bodies in various stages of decay.

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