Sam Hudzik

News Director

Sam has overseen local news coverage on New England Public Radio since 2013.

Before joining NEPR, he held a few positions at WBEZ Chicago – political reporter, newscast editor and newscast producer. Prior to that, he covered local angles on the federal government from Washington, D.C. for public radio stations in Illinois and Indiana.

Sam is proud to have edited his colleagues’ stories, including those recognized by the Third Coast International Audio Festival, the AP Broadcast Association of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, the Radio Television Digital News Association’s Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, Public Radio News Directors, Inc. (PRNDI) and the Missouri Review’s Miller Audio Award. Sam’s reporting has been recognized by the Illinois AP Broadcasters Association and the Murrow Awards.

He graduated from George Washington University and grew up in Park Forest, Illinois, and is grateful for his time in 2012-13 as a Knight-Wallace journalism fellow at the University of Michigan.

Before realizing he ought to be a reporter, Sam worked at a political research firm and as an aide to U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell.

Ways to Connect

John H Gray / Creative Commons

This week on Beacon Hill, lawmakers hear from western Massachusetts residents who say the region needs to be connected to Boston and Worcester by high-speed rail. 

Massachusetts State House.
AlexiusHoratius / Creative Commons

Before the end of the month, leaders in the Massachusetts Senate are hoping to pass sweeping changes to the state's criminal justice laws. 

A section of mural at the Seuss museum in Springfield, Mass.
Dave Roback / The Republican

Facing increasing pressure for how it's chosen to handle the legacy of a children's book author with a mixed record on issues of race and prejudice, the new Dr. Seuss Museum in Springfield, Mass., has acknowledged a change is needed.

Hundreds of Amherst College students rallied against racism following the discovery of a noose on Pratt Field Labor Day weekend 2017.
Diane Lederman / The Republican

Prosecutors will not to press hate crime charges -- or any charges at all -- against two juveniles who left a noose on the Amherst College football field over Labor Day weekend. 

Edward Nunez of Freedom Credit Union speaks at a press conference about getting help to hurricane victims in Puerto Rico held in Holyoke, Massachusetts on Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017.
Mike Plaisance / The Republican

NEPR News Now is a collection of recent features, interviews and commentaries. 

The polling place at Falcetti Towers in Holyoke, Mass., saw light turnout on Sept. 26, 2017, for a preliminary election for mayor.
Sam Hudzik / NEPR

Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse will take on former City Councilor Jay Ferreira in November. They led a field of four candidates in Tuesday's preliminary election.

Westfield State University, in Westfield, Mass.
File photo / The Republican

Westfield State University is investigating a racist message left on a dorm room door.

University president Ramon Torrecilha said he learned about this Tuesday evening after a student posted a photo on Twitter. It showed a name tag on a door with a handwritten message: a racial epithet for black people, then "live here."

Some immigrants without authorization who've been victims of crimes may be eligible for a U visa. Here, immigration lawyer Susan Roses, left, reviews documents and with Antonia concerning her U-visa filing.
Jesse Costa / WBUR

NEPR News Now is a collection of recent features, interviews and commentaries.

Jafet Robles (right), celebrates with City Councilor Adam Gomez.
File Photo / The Republican

Friends and fellow activists in the Springfield area are remembering Jafet Robles.

The 33-year-old organizer with the group Neighbor to Neighbor was found dead in Chicopee's Szot Park on Monday, and had been shot multiple times.

Springfield City Councilor Adam Gomez said Robles fought for a minimum wage hike, criminal justice reform and neighborhood issues in the city's North End. But Gomez also recalled a trip they took to Washington DC.

In May of 2015, about 5,500 students graduated from UMass Amherst during ceremonies at McGuirk Stadium on campus. This is Elizabeth Thomas of Medfield, Mass.
Don Treeger / The Republican

The new US News & World Report college rankings are out, and it's a mixed bag for Pioneer Valley schools, UMass Amherst dropped a spot in the national university rankings -- from 74 last year to 75. Its ranking has remained relatively steady since a big improvement four years ago.

 

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