BIAS

On a melancholy Saturday this past February, Shalon Irving's "village" — the friends and family she had assembled to support her as a single mother — gathered at a funeral home in a prosperous black neighborhood in southwest Atlanta to say goodbye.

In the kitchen of a small colonial house in Springfield, Mass., Edanry Rivera and Louis Mitchell do-si-do around a coffee maker, handing off the creamer and reaching for a refill.

"Coffee is the lifeblood of my very existence," says Louis Mitchell, 57, a bald transgender man with a graying goatee.

Mitchell owns this home. Rivera, a 27-year-old trans woman, rents a room. Many days, to avoid scoffs, stares and physical threats, Rivera never leaves the house.

"Once I step out there, it's war, sometimes, with people," Rivera says.

Brianna Brochu, a former University of Hartford student, was arraigned in Hartford this morning and charged in connection with alleged attacks on her roommate.

The Department of Justice has opened a probe into the role of race in Harvard University's admissions policies and is threatening to sue unless Harvard turns over documents by a Dec. 1 deadline, according to correspondence obtained by NPR.

The number of hate crimes reported last year rose by 4.6 percent compared to the previous year, according to data released Monday by the FBI.

The total tally of hate crimes in 2016 was 6,121, compared to 5,850 in 2015. More than half of those incidents were motivated by the victim's race.

The FBI statistics are based on voluntary reporting by nearly 16,000 local law-enforcement agencies. Civil-rights groups, however, say the figures are deeply flawed because of what they say is systemic under-reporting.

A new report on Connecticut police traffic stops singles out six local departments and a state police troop for pulling over minorities at higher rates than whites.

Westfield State University, in Westfield, Mass.
File photo / The Republican

Westfield State University is investigating a racist message left on a dorm room door.

University president Ramon Torrecilha said he learned about this Tuesday evening after a student posted a photo on Twitter. It showed a name tag on a door with a handwritten message: a racial epithet for black people, then "live here."

About 100 people gathered in a park  in downtown Claremont Tuesday night for a vigil in response to an alleged attack of an eight year-old biracial boy in the city.

At the event, it didn’t take long before racial tensions were on full display. Organizer Rebecca MacKenzie was introducing the night's first speaker when she was interrupted by a white man, driving by and and yelling from his truck.


Claremont City Manager Ryan McNutt and Police Chief Mark Chase will attend a community event Tuesday night aimed at responding to the alleged race-based attack of a young biracial boy in town, McNutt said.

The sign outside Meekins Library in Williamsburg, Mass. It normally lists hours of operation.
Meekins Library / Facebook

The small white sign outside the library in Williamsburg, Massachusetts, usually just lists the library's hours. That changed after the white nationalist rally earlier this month in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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