CONNECTICUT

Coverage of Connecticut from New England Public Radio, NPR, and other NPR stations.

Jamil Ragland lives in Hartford's north end.
Chion Wolf / WNPR


My 10-year-old son Gabriel loves baseball. When I received free tickets to a game at Dunkin' Donuts stadium this May, I pushed aside my feelings of hypocrisy and took him out to the old ball game.

It may be four months late, but Connecticut now has a new biennium budget.

When I moved to Hartford from Windsor four years ago, I was excited: a new place, new people, new stories. But as time went on I got bored with Hartford. Our city slogan is “Hartford Has It.” My friends and I would make fun of it, because there are times where it seems our city has nothing but poverty.

Former Trump Presidential Campaign Chair Paul Manafort, who’s been charged with multiple crimes in a federal indictment, started his political career as a teenager in his hometown of New Britain, Connecticut.

Government transparency may be one of the casualties of the bipartisan budget deal approved by the General Assembly. The public affairs television network CT-N took a budget hit that may force the network off the air as early as Wednesday when its current contract expires.

State lawmakers have passed a bipartisan compromise budget bill. But the legislature's work on the bill may not be done yet. 

Nelson Robles, 56, is the maintenance man at Primera Iglesia Bautista Emanuel church in downtown Bridgeport. He’s also a percussionist during mass. Every morning, he walks to the corner of his church – just off the altar to the right – and prays. He said that while he’s down on his knees looking for guidance, he feels God.

The Connecticut Capitol in Hartford.
Photo Phiend flickr.com/photos/photophiend / Creative Commons

A compromise budget passed Thursday in the Connecticut House of Representatives, 126-23. Earlier, the $41.3 billion budget overwhelmingly passed the state Senate, 33-3.

The Trump administration’s stance on immigration policy is being blamed for holding up federal policing money across the country, including Connecticut.

Nearly half of Connecticut’s high earners say they might leave the state in the next five years because of the state’s budget crisis and a ballooning cost of living. That’s according to a new survey from Sacred Heart University.

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