COURTS

Opioids
Hailey R. Staker / U.S. Air Force

Pittsfield, Sturbridge, West Springfield, Palmer, and Charlton are among the cities and towns in central and western Massachusetts that are taking legal action against manufacturers and distributors of opioids.

The Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.
Adam Frenier / NEPR

The vice president of the Berkshire Museum's board is defending a deal the museum struck with the Massachusetts attorney general's office. 

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

Court documents say the suspect in the shootings at a South Florida high school has confessed to investigators. Nikolas Cruz, 19, has been booked on 17 charges of premeditated murder at Broward County's Main Jail in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

The Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Mass.
Berkshire Museum / Creative Commons

There are plenty of complaints about a deal the Massachusetts attorney general struck with Berkshire Museum. 

A federal judge in New York has ruled that the Trump administration cannot end the Obama-era program designed to protect from deportation young immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children.

At first glance, the numbers look optimistic. After three years of increases in family court cases related to addiction such as child abuse and neglect, numbers were down for fiscal year 2017.

The Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.
AlexiusHoratius / Creative Commons

The Berkshire Museum said Friday it's reached a deal with Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey to resolve the legal fight over art the museum wants to sell.

The Massachusetts Statehouse in Boston.
AlexiusHoratius / Creative Commons

There's a shortage of attorneys willing to take child welfare cases in western Massachusetts, and state legislators are trying to address the issue. 

The police station in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.
Adam Frenier / NEPR

A Pittsfield police officer who fatally shot a man during a call last year will not face criminal charges. 

Federal immigration officers will continue their practice of going into federal, state and local courthouses seeking to arrest undocumented immigrants, despite the objections of immigrant advocates and some judges, including the chief justice of California.

In a two-page policy directive signed by the deputy director of U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, Thomas Homan, agents will take

Pages