ENVIRONMENT

Eastbound state route 57 entering Sandisfield, Mass.
John Phelan / Creative Commons

Federal regulators have brushed off a request by both Massachusetts U.S. senators to delay construction of a natural gas pipeline running through Otis State Forest in southern Berkshire County.

Pipeline protesters and their supporters outside of Southern Berkshire District Court in Great Barrington, Mass. after a hearing on May 11, 2017.
Adam Frenier / NEPR

Seventeen protesters arrested at the construction site of a natural gas pipeline in southern Berkshire county appeared in court Thursday in Great Barrington. And prosecutors tossed them a curveball.

The "Witness Tree" in the Harvard Forest, located in Petersham, Mass.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

Author Lynda Mapes spent a year in the Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts, chronicling a single tree. This red oak stands in one of the oldest and most intensively studied research landscapes in North America. 

Springfield Signs 'Treaty' For Migratory Birds

May 7, 2017
A little blue heron at Springfield Plaza on Liberty Street in August 2014.
Greg Saulmon / The Republican

Springfield, Massachusetts, has adopted an Urban Conservation Treaty for Migratory Birds.

The city's science museum is introducing a new wildlife garden and residents will be encouraged to help create a network of neighborhood habitats.

Roxanne Bogart of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Springfield and the Connecticut River are important stops for birds migrating between South America and the Arctic.

Protesters block access to Otis State Forest in Sandisfield, Mass. where a natural gas pipeline is being built.
Mary Serreze / MassLive

Eighteen demonstrators were arrested Tuesday in southern Berkshire County at the construction site of a natural gas pipeline in Otis State Forest.

State police say the protesters blocked access roads to the job site in an effort to keep construction workers away. Police spokesperson Dave Procopio said those arrested will be charged with trespassing.

Peter Ives gets his bike packed and ready to go on a eight day bike trip from Northampton to Washington DC, where his group will join the Peoples Climate March on April 29th, 2017.
Carol Lollis / Daily Hampshire Gazette

Activists will gather in Washington D.C. and locally on Saturday to protest President Trump's agenda on climate change and the environment.

Tom Crowe from Northampton is part of a group who spent eight days biking to Washington for the People's Climate March. He said peddling there is symbolic.

"The bicycle is one of the most fuel-efficient modes of transportation that humans have ever devised," Crowe said. "It only relies on carbohydrates. It doesn't need fossil fuels directly."

But Crowe said he'll be taking a bus back to western Mass.

Eastbound state route 57 entering Sandisfield, Mass.
John Phelan / Creative Commons

With work underway on a controversial natural gas pipeline in southern Berkshire County, activists are planning to protest at the site Friday.

A spokesperson for the company Kinder Morgan said crews are setting up erosion protection devices along the pipeline route in Otis State Forest, and tree cutting won't begin until that's complete.

Bennington residents who have been dealing with contaminated water are starting to get frustrated with the state's ability to find a long-term solution to their problem.

Each year billions of pounds of food go to waste. That means billions of dollars, too. The Environmental Protection Agency says more food reaches landfills and incinerators than any other one material in our trash. And for supermarkets, that leftover food equates to lost dollars.

A warning sign posted by opponents to a proposed toxic waste disposal site in the woods, near the Housatonic River  in Great Barrington, Mass.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

General Electric and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are battling over the last stretch of the PCB clean-up of the Housatonic River in Massachusetts from Pittsfield through Great Barrington.

GE is appealing the government’s clean-up plan, which is estimated to cost $613 million over 15 years. One big issue is where to put the toxic PCBs that are dug up from the river.

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