Children's books on display at a library.
Kalamazoo Public Library / Creative Commons /

A couple of months ago, I decided that I would take my five-year-old daughter with me to the local Women’s March. Since my explanations were not as clear as I wanted, I searched for a children’s book to help me explain the 2016 Women’s March to her. 

It was Saturday afternoon, and Abigail Spanberger was in a busy hallway at the Chesterfield County Public Library in Midlothian, Va., minutes away from training a room of about 40 campaign volunteers. She seemed ready for a quick interview, but then abruptly called out to her campaign manager.

"Hey Dana, Eileen Davis is about to come through. Can you head her off at the pass so she doesn't interrupt the — "

She cut herself off and turned to me.

"That's my mother," Spanberger said, laughing.

Her mom is volunteering for her campaign?


The Daily Hampshire Gazette is based in Northampton, Mass.
File photo / Daily Hampshire Gazette /

We kick off this week with many questions surfacing at The Daily Hampshire Gazette, based in Northampton. Its former executive editor says he was fired for speaking out for higher pay for female journalists, but a number of his former employees are questioning his commitment to the issue. 

The Daily Hampshire Gazette is based in Northampton, Mass.
File photo / Daily Hampshire Gazette /

The top editor at the Daily Hampshire Gazette and Greenfield Recorder said Wednesday he was fired for speaking out in favor of higher pay for female journalists, but his record on the issue was challenged within hours.

10,000 Take Part In Hartford Women's March

Jan 22, 2018

One of the over 500 Women’s Marches around the world happened in Hartford this weekend. The Hartford March focused on continued resistance to the Trump administration, getting more women into politics, and making the movement more inclusive.  

One could call it an ideal day for a protest.

The morning of the second annual Women's March on Washington was warm for a late-January day in the nation's capital. The water was frozen in the reflecting pool at the National Mall, but a coat was optional as temperatures approached 60 degrees.

Amid the government shutdown, the protesters gathered. They came in droves to the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and along the mall, huddling around a stage where speakers presented and shouted rallying cries before the audience, who responded with chants and cheers.

A car tail light.
ulleo / Creative Commons

Two New England states could allow people who don't identify as male or female a new way to indicate their gender on their driver's license. 

On a melancholy Saturday this past February, Shalon Irving's "village" — the friends and family she had assembled to support her as a single mother — gathered at a funeral home in a prosperous black neighborhood in southwest Atlanta to say goodbye.

In the kitchen of a small colonial house in Springfield, Mass., Edanry Rivera and Louis Mitchell do-si-do around a coffee maker, handing off the creamer and reaching for a refill.

"Coffee is the lifeblood of my very existence," says Louis Mitchell, 57, a bald transgender man with a graying goatee.

Mitchell owns this home. Rivera, a 27-year-old trans woman, rents a room. Many days, to avoid scoffs, stares and physical threats, Rivera never leaves the house.

"Once I step out there, it's war, sometimes, with people," Rivera says.

An ultrasound image of a 20-week-old fetus.
Michael Fürstenberg / Creative Commons

Many years ago, when I was pregnant and gender identity was not in the news, I struggled with ideas about my baby’s biological sex.