GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

Updated at 2:17 p.m. ET

Attorney General Jeff Sessions was interviewed last week by special counsel Robert Mueller as part of the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Sessions is the first member of President Trump's Cabinet known to have been questioned by the special counsel's office in its investigation into possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

Justice Department spokesman Ian Prior confirmed Sessions' interview to NPR on Tuesday. Sessions cooperated voluntarily.

"I'd love to see us get something like our Housing Choices legislation done and few other items like that," Gov. Charlie Baker told reporters.
Sam Doran / State House News Service

With many of his legislative proposals idling on Beacon Hill, Gov. Charlie Baker will tout the benefits of bipartisanship and cooperation with the Democrat-controlled Legislature when he addresses the state on Tuesday night as the popular Republican enters the final year of his first-term looking to cement the record he will run on for re-election.

Updated at 5:06 p.m. ET

The federal government is back open for business on Tuesday, but the immigration fight that brought it to a three-day shutdown is far from over.

Updated at 9:05 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed a stopgap spending bill passed by Congress on Monday, ending the partial shutdown of the federal government after three days.

The White House has said normal government operations will resume by Tuesday morning.

10,000 Take Part In Hartford Women's March

Jan 22, 2018

One of the over 500 Women’s Marches around the world happened in Hartford this weekend. The Hartford March focused on continued resistance to the Trump administration, getting more women into politics, and making the movement more inclusive.  

The Federal Emergency Management Agency says that two dozen Puerto Rican families who relocated Hartford will no longer be eligible for housing assistance on Monday because inspections showed little or no damage to their homes in Puerto Rico.

The effects of the partial government shutdown were already reverberating in Massachusetts on day 2, as tourists visiting Boston expressed their disappointment at the closure of the Bunker Hill Monument in Charlestown.

The monument is a U.S. National Park — run by the federal government — and will remain closed until the federal government reopens.

Vice President Pence says the U.S. will complete the plan to move its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem by the end of 2019, announcing a faster timeline for opening the embassy than had been previously reported. Pence announced the new deadline during his visit to Israel.

"In the weeks ahead, our administration will advance its plan to open the United States Embassy in Jerusalem — and that United States Embassy will open before the end of next year," Pence said.

Updated at 10:01 p.m. ET

The Senate will vote at noon on Monday to end the government shutdown. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell took to the floor Sunday evening and laid out a plan to restore government funding for three weeks and consider immigration proposals, while bipartisan talks continue to end the impasse that has triggered a partial government shutdown since Friday night.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer objected to a vote on Sunday evening, but not the plan to vote on Monday.

One could call it an ideal day for a protest.

The morning of the second annual Women's March on Washington was warm for a late-January day in the nation's capital. The water was frozen in the reflecting pool at the National Mall, but a coat was optional as temperatures approached 60 degrees.

Amid the government shutdown, the protesters gathered. They came in droves to the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and along the mall, huddling around a stage where speakers presented and shouted rallying cries before the audience, who responded with chants and cheers.

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