HARTFORD

Guillermo Class just couldn’t wait any more. The reports he was getting from his two teenage sons living in Puerto Rico weren’t good. Food and water were getting to them and their mother. But not enough.

Residents gathered at a rally in downtown Hartford Wednesday to call attention to the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico. 

As the state continues to operate without a budget, the impact on the city of Hartford only get more dire.

Not long after the state Supreme Court tossed his original felony convictions and ordered two new trials in 2016, former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez started getting a city pension worth $2,328.76 a month

Former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez pleaded guilty Thursday to charges he accepted a bribe from one contractor and tried to extort another, ending a decade-long saga that forced him from office in 2010, changed this city’s political landscape, and forever linked his “local boy does good” story with the word corruption. 

City Hall in Hartford, Conn.
Heather Brandon / WNPR

The city of Hartford has launched a new program help residents without standard forms of identification.

Hartford City ID is modeled on similar efforts in New Haven and New York City.

The goal is to allow all residents to be able to do everything from getting a city permit to a library card -- and the Hartford Police will accept the ID as proof of identification.

Mayor Luke Bronin said the initiative will help those in a wide variety of circumstances.

The iconic cover art of Radiohead’s album OK Computer shows a heavily distorted picture of an anonymous highway interchange. The band has never said where the picture came from. Now some internet sleuths think they’ve found it – in Hartford, Connecticut.

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin has released his $612.9 million budget proposal to the City Council, one that avoids layoffs, cuts funding to most community organizations, assumes more labor concessions, understaffs departments, and still has a $49 million hole.

But there's no more to cut, Bronin said, without compromising the city. 

Dear Hartford: Climb Right In.

Feb 9, 2017
The Colt Armory in Hartford, Conn.
Aaron Knox / Creative Commons

Commentator Julia Pistell moved to Hartford years ago on a compromise. Her not-yet-husband had a job in insurance in Hartford, so Pistell packed up her books and sublet her South Bronx apartment. She’s been here ever since, and is happy about what the city has asked of her. She wants others in the region to recognize it’s asking things of them too.

We didn’t have a car. I didn’t have a job. I had about $200 from walking pit bulls.