HISTORY

Entrance to the Baseball in the Berkshires Museum.
Courtesy Baseball in the Berkshires Museum

With more empty storefronts than full ones, the 30-year-old Berkshire Mall in Lanesborough, Massachusetts, has seen better days. But near Spencer Gifts and a now-shuttered Hollister, something rather unexpected is alive and well: baseball.

Angelina Morales holds her Connecticut history chapter book; Chapter 2 is about the African-American dancer, Dollie McLean.
Tema Silk / NEPR

In Connecticut, third- and fourth-graders study the history of their state. In many schools, students choose to research one person or event from an approved list. The people on that list have been mostly men, and all white.

The portrait of Russell Sturgis at the Worcester Art Museum has a new sign next to it with information about his connections to slavery.
Robin Lubbock / WBUR

At the Worcester Art Museum's early American portrait gallery, I was recently struck by a painting of a man named Russell Sturgis.

Racial justice advocates say students of color often don’t see themselves reflected in public school curriculum in Vermont, but supporters of an ethnic studies bill are having a tough time getting traction in Montpelier.

Blessed Sacrament students Dara Cassidy, Siobhan Armstrong, Molly Smith and Gracie Chesmore place flags on graves belonging to veterans at Cavalry Cemetery in Holyoke, Massachusetts.
Sean Teehan / NEPR

If you drive past a cemetery on Memorial Day, you might notice small American flags planted next to certain cemetery plots. That's because in recent weeks, volunteers have placed flags next to the headstones of military veterans.

Khalif Neville on keyboard, with his father Charles Neville on saxophone.
Courtesy Khalif Neville

We're still seeing the fallout of what could be the biggest political story in our region this year: the dramatic fall from power of former Senate President Stan Rosenberg. His resignation followed a critical ethics report. Many of Rosenberg's constituents told us they are sad and disappointed he's leaving, though not all think it's the wrong move.

Which Kanye Is It That Thinks Slavery Was A Choice?

May 23, 2018
Kanye West performing in 2011.
Rodrigo Ferrari / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/rodrigoferrari

“That’s just Kanye being Kanye.”

That’s what we said when he ran up on stage to interrupt Taylor Swift’s acceptance speech to say Beyoncé deserved it.

Jamil Ragland tutors writing at Capitol Community College in Hartford.
Chion Wolf / WNPR

I was helping a student recently with a paper she was writing. It was on the poem "Ballad of Birmingham," about the 1963 church bombing. 

What You Don't Know About Midnight Rider Paul Revere

May 10, 2018
The Paul Revere statue at the Paul Revere Mall riding away from the Old North Church in the North End of Boston.
Jesse Costa / WBUR

The great American patriot and Bostonian Paul Revere died 200 years ago on May 10, 1818. He's often remembered as one of the infamous "midnight riders" who rode into Concord, Massachusetts, to warn residents about a planned British attack.

Evan Lewis of Northampton, Massachusetts, with a photo of his great-grandfather Lent Shaw.
Joyce Skowyra / NEPR

The country's first national memorial to the victims of lynching opens April 27 in Alabama. One of the thousands of victims was Lent Shaw, a successful black farmer in Colbert, Georgia, accused -- many believe falsely -- of assaulting a white woman. 

Editor's note: This story contains content some may find upsetting.

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