HISTORY

Original WWI artwork from Armory employee Joseph Farrelley was featured on posters and in newsletters to inspire employees.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

The Springfield Armory played a key role in making the rifles and other weapons used by the three and a half million American soldiers who fought in World War I. 

A section of mural at the Seuss museum in Springfield, Mass.
Dave Roback / The Republican

Facing increasing pressure for how it's chosen to handle the legacy of a children's book author with a mixed record on issues of race and prejudice, the new Dr. Seuss Museum in Springfield, Mass., has acknowledged a change is needed.

Sunday was a historic day for the intersection of sports and politics.

Widespread protests in the National Football League, the most popular professional sport in America, were shown on broadcast channels across the country.

Stick to sports? Not this week. Whether sports fans wanted to see it or not, they couldn't avoid politics.

The monument to 16 soliders who died in a military plane crash in Peru, Massachusetts, on August 15, 1942.
Adam Frenier / NEPR

Seventy-five years ago, a military transport plane crashed in a remote section of Peru, Massachusetts, killing 16 of the servicemen on board. The victims will be remembered in a ceremony marking the anniversary, as will the story of how this tiny Berkshire County town rallied to help in the rescue.

The former Clinton A.M.E Zion Church in Great Barrington, Mass.
Adam Frenier / NEPR

A church in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, that civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois attended as a young man may have a new lease on life. 

The Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church is on the National Register of Historic Places, but has been closed for a few years and has fallen into disrepair. Now community members are buying the 130-year-old structure, with hopes of renovating it.

Henry Epp / NEPR

Over the next few months, workers at the Springfield Armory will be digging a lot of dirt. They’re restructuring parts of the armory’s grounds to recreate the landscape of the National Historic Site to what it looked like in the 1950s. They’ll even plant specific trees to match that era, which was the last time the armory was really in business. It built and developed weapons for the U.S. military.

At the Armory grounds, Superintendent James Woolsey explained how crews have begun turning a field into a sloping hill.

What Photographs Can Teach Us About Our Leaders

Jan 24, 2017
Barack Obama before going out to take the oath in 2009
Pete Souza / Official White House Photo

The day before President Trump was inaugurated, commentator and art historian Paul Staiti was passing though an airport in Los Angeles when he noticed Barack Obama’s photograph greeting every arriving passenger.  Staiti found himself contemplating the image, and its imminent disappearance.

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