HUMAN BEHAVIOR

'We're All In Lockdown': Lessons From Northampton, Mass.

Jun 15, 2018
Anabel Rosero, left, walks with her daughter Anaisha Feliciano, 12, after Anaisha had been released from a lockdown at JFK Middle School in Northampton, Thursday.
Carol Lollis / Daily Hampshire Gazette / gazettenet.com

When a man with two guns was spotted on a Northampton, Massachusetts, middle school campus, the police responded perfectly. No one was hurt. Best-case scenario, right?

Nurse Rachel Walker, demonstrating one of her inventions.
Heather Duggan / UMass

A UMass Amherst nursing professor has been named to a national panel of inventors -- the first nurse to be honored alongside engineers and computer scientists from companies like Microsoft and IBM.

Cristopher "Domi" Lora, a senior, and Marco Jusino, a junior, are peer leaders in Pa'lante. They facilitate restorative justice circles for students in conflict at Holyoke High School.
Ben James / NEPR

Walk down the hallway at Holyoke High School and step into room 319, the student support room, and you’ll see a dozen chairs arranged in a broad circle. There are plants in the windows. 

In the wake of the Parkland high school massacre, there's been renewed interest in "red flag" laws, which allow courts and police to temporarily remove guns from people perceived to pose a threat.

The new research offers insight into the laws' effect — and it may not be what you think.

"Although these laws tended to be enacted after mass shooting events, in practice, they tend to be enforced primarily for suicide prevention," says Aaron Kivisto, a clinical psychologist with the University of Indianapolis who studies gun violence prevention.

A former New Hampshire Supreme Court chief justice is visiting schools in New England to talk about the darkest time in his life. Usually he ends up hearing from students about some of their dark times, too.

The former justice, John Broderick, wants to encourage people to talk about mental illness, so he tells the story of his oldest son.

“He was a really talented artist and so he spent a lot of time in his room with the door closed, at his desk, drawing. Today I would describe it as withdrawing,” Broderick says.

Tools for repair.
falconp4 / Creative Commons

I recently retired, and have done what many new old fogeys do: I finished a long-term project, renewed my gym membership and — yes — cleaned closets. I also did something I never expected. I reached out to an estranged friend.

Progress continues on the MGM Springfield casino project as they look to the grand opening in five months. This is the view along Main Street looking south.
Don Treeger / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

A new survey from Western New England University finds a majority of Springfield, Massachusetts, residents continue to support the MGM casino project downtown, 61 to 26 percent.

On a recent Saturday, comedian Jocelyn Chia owns the room of about 100 people at Doyle’s Cafe in Jamaica Plain. “I went to this all-girl Catholic high school in Singapore. Anyone else here … a slut?” she asks, pausing for just the right sliver of time before delivering the punch line to a roaring audience.

Roseann Sdoia, who lost part of her right leg in the Boston Marathon blast five years ago, says it's still sometimes hard to comprehend how her annual outing to watch the race on that sunny Spring day changed her life forever.

"I still wake up in the morning five years later and go 'Oh my God, I don't have a leg,'" she says. "Even though I live it every day, and every day I have to put this stupid [prosthetic leg] on and lug it around ... I still have a really hard time thinking to myself what really happened."

Dennis Rainear was 10 miles into the Grand Valley Marathon when he was hit. Something struck the top of his head and nearly knocked him over. He staggered for a few steps.

“Put my hand immediately to my head, and it was just like in the cartoons, where you see a guy get a big goose egg on his head when he gets bonked,” Dennis says. “Sure enough, I had a big goose egg on my head.”

Dennis’ head started throbbing, his ears ringing, and his vision blurring. But he looked at his hand and didn’t see any blood. So, he kept running and trying to figure out what happened.

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