IMMIGRATION

The Trump administration cannot withhold federal money to punish local governments for their noncompliance with immigration authorities, according to a ruling by a federal judge in California.

In an order announced Monday, Judge William Orrick permanently blocked the policy, issued as one of President Trump's earliest executive orders, ruling it was "unduly coercive" and violated the separation of powers.

In a church basement in Roxbury, a group of immigrants discuss the documentaries they’re learning how to film. Guiding them are volunteers with the nonprofit Community Supported Film.

“It’s incredible to be in a room with 10 people from 10 different cultures, 10 different countries, different religions, different perspectives — in terms of our outlook on the immigrant experience,” says filmmaker Michael Sheridan, who leads the nonprofit.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement has denied a stay of deportation for a Stamford mother of two.

Some 50,000 Haitians who've lived and worked in the United States since a catastrophic earthquake there in 2010 are reeling from news that their special protected status will be canceled.

They have 18 months until their temporary protected status — or TPS — is terminated in the summer of 2019. A statement from The Department of Homeland Security says the 18-month lead time is to "allow for an orderly transition before the designation terminates on July 22, 2019."

The American Medical Association (AMA) is opposing the presence of federal immigration agents in hospitals and clinics. A new resolution declaring this stance was passed Wednesday by the AMA's House of Delegates, the policy-making body for the association.

A federal appeals court in California has ruled that the Trump administration's long-delayed travel ban can go into partial effect, allowing the government to temporarily keep travelers from six Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States.

An estimated 8,000 immigrants in Massachusetts are awaiting decisions that will determine their fate in the United States.

For immigrants in the country illegally, the fear of running into U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents has made some public places appear threatening. In the current environment, that can include a visit to the emergency room.

Amid the Trump administration's efforts to arrest people living in the country illegally, the Department of Homeland Security is looking at locations for five new detention centers around the country that could hold thousands of detainees.

Lucio Perez, center, in a red jacket, is surrounded by local clergy in front of the First Congregational Church in Amherst, Massachusetts.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

A church in Amherst, Massachusetts, is allowing a Guatemalan man facing deportation to live in the building for the foreseeable future.

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