Federal immigration officers will continue their practice of going into federal, state and local courthouses seeking to arrest undocumented immigrants, despite the objections of immigrant advocates and some judges, including the chief justice of California.

In a two-page policy directive signed by the deputy director of U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, Thomas Homan, agents will take

Protesters hold signs and banners at a DACA rally in San Francisco, California, in September 2017.
Pax Ahimsa Gethen / Creative Commons /

A coalition of 16 states, including four from New England, fought the Trump administration in court on Tuesday. They want to overturn the president's decision to end DACA, a program protecting immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children. 

Boston Public Schools is coming under fire from immigration advocates over concerns about the sharing of student information with federal immigration officials.

New Haven Mayor Toni Harp is in Washington, D.C., for the U.S. Conference of Mayors this week, but she did not attend a meeting with President Donald Trump that was on the agenda.

More than 200 people turned up at the corner of Washington and School Streets to the SEIU immigrant rally in reaction to statements made by President Trump threatening to strip federal funding from so-called "sanctuary cities."
Jesse Costa / WBUR

Lawrence, Massachusetts, and Burlington, Vermont, are two of 23 jurisdictions that received a letter from the U.S. Justice Department threatening to pull certain federal grant funds if the communities cannot prove they comply with federal immigration authorities.

U.S. Attorney Andrew Lelling sits down with members of the media in his office on Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018.
Sam Doran / State House News Service

Opioid crimes are his top drug enforcement priority, but U.S. Attorney Andrew Lelling told reporters Wednesday that his enforcement of federal marijuana laws could ensnare anyone from an hourly wage employee at a marijuana dispensary to a bank that opens an account for a pot shop.

Updated at 8:06 a.m. ET, Jan. 18

Congressional leaders plan to vote later this week on a month-long spending bill but the ongoing fight over immigration threatens to derail the plan days before the Friday deadline to prevent a government shutdown.

Republican leaders say they are confident that Congress will vote this week to extend current spending levels until February 16 but Democrats and some far-right conservatives are threatening to block the legislation.

President Trump and congressional Democrats appear no closer to a deal on protecting "Dreamers" from deportation, but GOP lawmakers are working on a Plan B that would — if approved — prevent an election-year shutdown of the government, extending funding at least another month.

A continuing resolution is due to expire this Friday, but Republicans have proposed kicking the can down the road once more with an extension on stop-gap funding through Feb. 16.

Joe Arpaio, the controversial former sheriff from Arizona, announced this week that he will run for the U.S. Senate to help advance President Trump's agenda.

But he is breaking from the president on the future of people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

"Deport them," Arpaio told NPR Morning Edition's Rachel Martin in an interview that aired Thursday morning.

Federal immigration enforcement agents raided 7-Eleven stores across the country early Wednesday, in search of employees who are in the U.S. illegally and managers who knowingly employ them.

Agents with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement conducted sweeps of 98 stores in 17 states and Washington, D.C., arresting 21 people on suspicion of being in the country illegally.