IMMIGRATION

Dr. Thomas Michel unzips a black roller bag and pulls out a bright red accordion. It’s Rosie, his “protest accordion.”

Michel, who heads up a cardiovascualar lab through Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, is at Logan Airport with a few colleagues from the lab. Michel leads them in a sampling of patriotic folk songs.

This is a welcome party that was supposed to happen in February, when an Iranian doctor was scheduled to arrive at Logan to begin his Harvard Med School post-doc position.

Boston’s immigrant communities are responding with anger and fear to the recent arrests of some 50 people across the state by federal agents this week. Immigration and Customs Enforcement — or ICE — targeted Massachusetts as part of a nation-wide crack-down on people in the country illegally who had also committed crimes. But immigrant advocates in Boston say the raids are sweeping up the innocent and leaving neighborhoods terrified.

This week, the Trump administration announced it arrested almost five hundred people across the country for immigration violations, focusing on areas that don't cooperate with immigration officers.

Republicans who might have been leery of supporting the bipartisan Dream Act got a more conservative-friendly option this week in the form of a new bill dubbed the SUCCEED Act (Solution for Undocumented Children through Careers, Employment, Education and Defending our nation).

The Trump administration plans to cap the number of refugees the U.S. will accept next year at 45,000. That is a dramatic drop from the level set by the Obama administration and would be the lowest number in years.

The White House formally announced its plans in a report to congressional leaders Wednesday, as required by law.

The number of refugees the U.S. admits has fluctuated over time. But this cap is the lowest that any White House has sought since the president began setting the ceiling on refugee admissions in 1980.

President Donald Trump's new travel restrictions are prompting reactions from both sides of the debate in the U.S. over immigration.

Edwin Cruz is one of three-quarter of a million Dreamers, young people that immigrated to United States and continue to live here under DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act signed by President Obama in 2012. Ilan Stavans talks with Edwin in this episode of In Contrast. 

Stavans Tertulia
NEPR

Tertulia's guest on September 17, 2017, was Ilan Stavans, professor at Amherst College as well as an editor, translator and essayist. In celebration of the National Hispanic Heritage Month, he read poetry by poets Pablo Neruda, from Chile and César Vallejo, from Perú, in Spanish and it's English translation. He also expressed his concern about the future of the Dreamers and the DACA program.

The future for thousands of young people in Massachusetts is unclear after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday that the Trump administration would end the program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

In November 2016, Amherst College student Irisdelia Garcia spoke during a protest against the immigration policies proposed by Donald Trump.
Carol Lollis / Gazettenet

President Donald Trump's likely repeal of a program that protects some undocumented immigrants from deportation would threaten thousands across New England, placing some in dire situations.

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