MARIJUANA

From legislation to legalization follow the local impacts of the cannabis industry.

Exterior MGM Springfield's entrance to the South End Market off MGM Way at State Street in downtown Springfield, Massachusetts.
MARK M. MURRAY / THE REPUBLICAN / masslive.com/photos

Construction is wrapping up on the MGM Springfield casino. The company says it is exceeding diversity goals when it comes to minorities, women and veterans. 

Marijuana in a bloom room at the INSA marijuana dispensary in Easthampton, Massachusetts.
Jerrey Roberts / Daily Hampshire Gazette / gazettenet.com

This episode, we focus on a single plant. Weed, cannabis, marijuana, pot --  whatever you call it, Massachusetts is on a slow march to full legalization.

A sales associate at New England Treatment Access in Brookline, a medical dispensary, places medicinal marijuana into a container.
Jesse Costa / WBUR

The Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission is reviewing its first license application from an independent testing laboratory, a critical link of the supply chain without which non-medical marijuana cannot be sold. 

U.S. Attorney Andrew Lelling sits down with members of the media in his office on Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018.
Sam Doran / State House News Service

U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts Andrew Lelling issued a statement on Tuesday expanding upon his previous comments about how his office will approach the newly state-legal marijuana industry, which remains wholly illegal under federal law.

Guns for sale in Millbury, Massachusetts.
Sean / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/22280677@N07

In late June, a gun store in Charlemont, Massachusetts, posted a letter on Facebook from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

The Massachusetts Statehouse.
ahundt / Creative Commons

The new fiscal year started on Sunday, but Massachusetts does not have a budget in place. This makes the Bay State the only state in the nation without one. 

Marijuana.
futurefilmworks / Creative Commons

The state's Cannabis Control Commission has released the names of 11 companies that have applied to run marijuana businesses in nine communities in western Massachusetts. If licensed, the companies promise to bring tax revenue, jobs and other economic benefits to the cities and towns that host them.

Pipes for a sale at a Dead & Company show in 2018 in Connecticut.
Karen Brown / New England Public Radio

A new survey of Massachusetts residents found more than a fifth of adults said they'd used marijuana in the past 30 days. The study was commissioned by the Massachusetts legislature, to help gauge the eventual impact of marijuana legalization in the state. 

A marijuana store advertisement in Seattle, Washington.
adrienblanc / Creative Commons / flickr.com/people/49457879@N07

No stores in Massachusetts yet are able to sell marijuana for recreational use, but the first could open within a few weeks. 

A box of joints branded as Dogwalkers are sold at Rise, a marijuana medical dispensary in Amherst, Massachusetts.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

A day that many people have long pushed for in Massachusetts finally arrived. If you’re over 21 it’s legal, now, to buy marijuana in a store licensed by the state. But the illegal market isn’t expected to go away anytime soon.

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