National & World News

Coverage of national and world news from New England Public Radio, NPR, and other NPR stations.

A Pentagon report has found that Islamist extremists ambushed and killed four U.S. troops in Niger last October after a series of missteps left the Americans exposed and vulnerable in a remote corner of the African nation.

The Pentagon has sent the classified report to Congress and military officers have started to brief the families of the soldiers who were killed. The report has not been released publicly, but an official who has seen it described it to NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman.

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson wants Americans living on housing assistance to put more of their income toward rent and he wants to give public housing authorities the ability to impose work requirements on tenants.

Under current law, most tenants who get federal housing assistance pay 30 percent of their adjusted income toward rent, and the government kicks in the rest up to a certain amount.

Since President Emmanuel Macron arrived in Washington, D.C., on Monday for the first state visit of President Trump's administration, the French leader has tried to persuade the American president not to abandon the three-year-old nuclear agreement with Iran next month.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Chronicle of Higher Education reported an unusual discovery on Monday. The founder, editor and columnist of a website that bills itself as a resource for student loan news does not exist.

When a consumer has a complaint about a bank, whether it's dealing with a mortgage or a credit card, right now there's a place to lodge that complaint online.

When it comes to the nitty, gritty details, life in antiquity was pretty stinky – in a literal sense. Without high food and personal hygienic standards, most people probably contracted an intestinal worm at some point or another, says veterinary scientist Martin Søe. "I think it's fair to say it was very, very common. In places with low hygienic standards, you still have a lot of whipworm and round worm."

A nameless faceless serial murderer, often known as the Golden State Killer, who terrorized several California counties from 1976 until 1986, now has a face and a name, officials say.

Authorities identified James Joseph DeAngelo, 72, of Citrus Heights, Calif., as the suspect Wednesday, more than four decades after the start of a crime spree consisting of about four dozen rapes and a dozen murders.

At a Sacramento press conference, officials said DeAngelo was arrested late Tuesday at his home outside the city, thanks to DNA analysis.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In jails and prisons across the United States, mental illness is prevalent and psychiatric disorders often worsen because inmates don't get the treatment they need, says journalist Alisa Roth.

In her new book Insane: America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness, Roth investigates the widespread incarceration of the mentally ill in the U.S., and what she sees as impossible burdens placed on correctional officers to act as mental health providers when they're not adequately trained.

Pages