National & World News

Coverage of national and world news from New England Public Radio, NPR, and other NPR stations.

The U.S. and South Korea have called off upcoming military exercises that were set to occur over the next three months, the Pentagon announced Friday evening.

According to the statement, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis made the decision to "indefinitely suspend select exercises," including the Ulchi Freedom Guardian exercise, which was put on hold earlier this week, along with two Korean Marine Exchange Program training exercises.

The fact that rural, economically disadvantaged parts of the country broke heavily for the Republican candidate in the 2016 election is well known. But Medicare data indicate that voters in areas that went for Trump weren't just hurting economically — many of them were receiving prescriptions for opioid painkillers.

A Global Guide For Leery Travelers

Jun 23, 2018

With its tropical beaches and a memorable national park, Venezuela was a popular destination for American tourists a decade ago. But years of political and economic turmoil have left its tourism industry in tatters.

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

World Health Organization recognizes gaming as addictive disorder

A new study published in the journal Science finds that methane emissions from U.S. oil and gas operations are 60 percent higher than previous estimates from the federal government.

Peace talks between the leaders of South Sudan's warring factions have proven so far to be unfruitful, with no agreement on the table and their June 30 deadline nearing, Carolyn Thompson reports for NPR.

A spokesman for South Sudan government said Friday "we have had enough."

The total number of people apprehended for illegally crossing the southern U.S. border has been steadily falling for almost two decades. It's a long-term trend that sociologists, economists and federal officials have been tracking for years.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

After days of damaging news stories about an administration policy that separated immigrant families at the Southern border, President Trump tried to change the narrative Friday. He spoke up for grieving family members who have lost loved ones at the hands of people in the country illegally.

Updated at 5:09 p.m. ET

In the image, a little girl wails in uncomprehending sadness and anxiety.

Her face flushed nearly as pink as her shirt and shoes, she stares up at her mother and a U.S. official, both too tall to be seen. The 2-year-old Honduran child's panic is so palpable, it's difficult for a viewer not to feel it, too.

The fear of family separation is not new for many immigrants already living in the U.S. In fact, that fear, heightened in recent weeks, has been forcing a tough decision for some families. Advocates say a growing number of American children are dropping out of Medicaid and other government programs because their parents are undocumented.

Marlene is an undocumented resident of Texas and has two children who are U.S. citizens. (NPR is not using Marlene's last name because of her immigration status.) One of her kids has some disabilities.

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