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What's Next After The Russia Indictments?

Jul 14, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Angelique Kerber has won the Wimbledon women's singles title, beating Serena Williams 6-3, 6-3 in the final. She is the first German to win a Wimbledon singles title since Steffi Graf did so in 1996.

"This is one of the best moments of my career," Kerber told ESPN, saying that it has been her dream since childhood to win Wimbledon. She added that playing against Williams made the moment all the more significant: "Playing against Serena is always an honor for me."

Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Edinburgh and Glasgow on Saturday to protest against President Trump, who is spending the weekend in Scotland ahead of a meeting next week with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

For decades, people living in Zimbabwe have been taught that speaking their minds comes at a cost. Under former president Robert Mugabe, an authoritarian ruler who held power for more than 37 years, openly challenging the government meant risking arrest, beating or worse. There's still a law on the books that makes insulting the president a crime.

Huddled at a computer screen at the Denver Recovery Group, counselor Melissa McConnell looks at the latest urinalysis results for her client, Sara Florence.

Last fall, it lit up like a Christmas tree. Now it's all clean. Florence says she stopped using heroin five months ago; she stopped using methamphetamine not long after that.

"Shooting it, smoking it, snorting it," Florence says. "It's horrible, just made me feel like crap, you know. But I'd still did it. Just makes no sense, you know. It's just really addicting."

Tech workers from Salesforce, Microsoft, Amazon and Google have been putting pressure on their CEOs to cut ties and end contracts with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, known as ICE, and other government agencies.

It's a rare occurrence for employees to tell their bosses to turn away business. But there is a growing concern among tech workers that the cutting-edge tools they create can be used in immoral ways.

Summits between U.S. presidents and Kremlin leaders are often filled with great drama and moments that shape history.

And then there's Boris Yeltsin's 1994 visit to Washington.

At a typical home game for the Washington Nationals, D.C.'s Major League Baseball team, about 60 vendors in neon yellow shirts walk up and down the aisles selling food and drink. The most popular concession by far is beer, and Christy Colt is great at selling it.

"Bud, Bud Light, Stella, Shock Top, IPA!" That's her refrain, and she sticks to it. No shticks, no silly voices, no sleights of hand.

Updated Saturday at 10:45 a.m. ET

This week in the Russia investigations: Six insights about the latest master blast from special counsel Robert Mueller.

The big one

As the noted counterintelligence analyst Kenny Loggins once said: "This is it."

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