NEW HAMPSHIRE

Coverage of New Hampshire from New England Public Radio, NPR, and other NPR stations.

Small towns in New Hampshire are struggling to find and keep quality police chiefs. This fall, the town of Newbury let it's police chief go. Bristol's police chief resigned, citing personnel issues. And the town of Webster had disagreements with its police chief, a dispute which ended up in court.

Andrew Shagoury is the police chief for the town of Tuftonboro, and the president of the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Shagoury about the difficulties with hiring police chiefs in smaller towns.

Environmentalists see the switch from combustion engine to electric cars as a powerful tool to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

But Bill Hensley, who lives in central Maine, said he bought an all-electric Nissan Leaf this summer mostly because it’s a cool technology.

“I guess it goes in that order: cool factor, savings and then saving the planet,” he said, laughing.

New research from the University of New Hampshire says the greenest way to heat your home this winter is a wood pellet stove.

Using wood pellets to heat a home in New England produces about half the amount of greenhouse gas emissions compared to fossil fuel sources, according to research from University of New Hampshire professor John Gunn. He said that comparison isn’t just about how clean wood pellets burn, it's also about the amount of emissions the entire wood pellet economy creates.

Governor Chris Sununu and Vermont Governor Phil Scott signed a joint letter to House and Senate leadership Monday, calling on Congress to increase funding for fighting and preventing forest fires.

“This is far from just a ‘Western’ issue,” they wrote, arguing the Forest Service is increasingly allocating its funds to fight fires at the expense of other priorities.

Think bagpipes, and you likely think Scotland. But one of the world’s largest bagpipe manufacturers happens to call Nashua, New Hampshire home.

That company, however, is facing an unexpected wrinkle in its international supply chain.

The New Hampshire Democrats’ annual Kennedy Clinton Dinner is one of the party’s marquee fundraisers – a chance to bask in recent electoral victories and channel the party’s energy before the next campaign season kicks into gear.

But as Democrats gathered in Hollis for this year’s dinner, the reputation one of its namesakes was getting fresh scrutiny – and not just from political opponents.

U.S. Supreme Court.
MattWade / Creative Commons

George and Maxine Maynard have what you might call a complicated relationship with New Hampshire's state motto. 

There’s a doctor in New London who’s ending her decades-long medical practice on Friday. She’s nearly 85, but her retirement is not voluntary. She says she’s being forced to shut down by a system that no longer values the type of patient-centered medicine that she practices. But the New Hampshire Board of Medicine has a different take. They’re challenging her medical decision making and other aspects of her work. 

Inside Daddypops Tumble Inn Diner in Claremont, the owner’s daughter – Fallon Carter – is working behind the counter as she talks with her mom and a friend.

They’re discussing a recent incident in town that’s been all over the news. The family of a young biracial boy says local teenagers intentionally hanged their son in a lynching-style attack. He survived, but had to be airlifted to the hospital.

The first few weeks of school in the towns of Durham, Lee, and Madbury have been clouded by allegations of racist bullying  on a school bus.

NHPR’s Jason Moon recently sat down with the superintendent of the school district and the parents of the alleged victim to hear how each are grappling with the situation.

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