A student at the Ralph C. Mahar Regional School in Orange, Massachusetts, reads the names of 17 victims in last month's school shooting in Parkland, Florida. A chime was sounded after each name.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

A big story this week was the student walkouts across the region and the country, on the one-month anniversary of the high school shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Activists across the country say they are being targeted by federal immigration authorities for speaking out at protests and accusing the government of heavy-handed tactics.

The Trump administration has warned that anyone in the country illegally could be arrested and deported under tough new enforcement rules. And federal officials deny allegations of retaliation.

But the American Civil Liberties Union and other groups say they have documented two dozen cases of immigrant activists and volunteers who say they have been arrested or face fines for their work.

The use of facial scanning is becoming commonplace — maybe you've heard of the new iPhone? It's also coming to an airport near you.

At Orlando International Airport, Britain-bound passengers — some wearing Mickey Mouse T-shirts and other Disney paraphernalia — lined up at Gate 80 recently for the evening British Airways flight to London's Gatwick Airport. It looks like any other airport departure area, except for the two small gates with what look like small boxes on posts next to them. Those boxes are actually cameras.

Students at the Ralph C. Mahar Regional School in Orange, Massachusetts, take place in a national walkout on March 14, 2018.
Jill Kaufman / New England Public Radio

On the dot of 10 a.m., even as walkways were still being treated for ice the morning after a nor'easter, students from the Ralph C. Mahar Regional School in Orange, Massachusetts, and many teachers, took part in Wednesday's national school walkout.

School students around Connecticut joined a national school walkout in protest against gun violence Wednesday. But the way the event was handled by school administration varied widely from district to district.

About 200 people attended a gun control rally across the street from gun manufacturer Smith & Wesson's headquarters in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 14, 2018.
Sean Teehan / NEPR

After students across the country walked out of class in a call for gun control legislation, teens and adults in Springfield, Massachusetts, held a rally outside the headquarters of gun manufacturer Smith & Wesson.

High school students on Long Island and in Connecticut walked out of their classes today in solidarity with students around the country in a nationwide call for legislative action to end gun violence in schools.

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET

At South High School in Columbus, Ohio, students stepped outside in frigid weather and said 17 names, releasing a balloon for each one.

In Orange County, Fla., 17 empty desks sat in the Wekiva High School courtyard. Students sang — "Heal the world, make it a better place."

Connecticut has spent over $50 million helping schools beef up security since 2013. Some of that money -- $3.2 million -- has gone to private schools, which are reimbursed at a higher rate than many public schools.

Students will be walking out of schools across Connecticut Wednesday to express their concerns about gun violence. School districts around the state have been responding to the effort in different ways.