PUERTO RICO

Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico on September 20, and a month later, clean water continues to be hard to come by for some residents -- particularly those in more rural parts of the island.

The Coliseo is the biggest concert hall in San Juan, Puerto Rico. But since Hurricane Maria devastated the island a month ago, it's become the center of a massive effort to feed tens of thousands left hungry by the storm — an effort led by celebrity chef José Andrés.

"We're about to reach the million and a half [meals] served — a vast majority of them hot meals," says Andrés, who is known for his upscale restaurants in Washington, D.C., and for canceling his plans to open one in Donald Trump's D.C. hotel.

A scene from Puerto Rico this week. "President Trump seems to be using the number of fatalities to determine the quality of the disaster response," Sen. Elizabeth Warren said.
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Several New England U.S. Senators are among those urging federal officials to make sure the hurricane death toll in Puerto Rico is accurate.

A Puerto Rico couple has made it to Boston in the wake of Hurricane Maria to save their baby’s life.

The couple is staying with an American family in Brookline as they await appointments for their daughter at Children’s Hospital.

Alianette Andino and Kelvin Garcia live in Maunabo, on the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. It’s normally an hour-and-a-half drive to San Juan.

They have a 14-month-old daughter, Amaia.

Guillermo Class just couldn’t wait any more. The reports he was getting from his two teenage sons living in Puerto Rico weren’t good. Food and water were getting to them and their mother. But not enough.

The city of Bridgeport, Connecticut, is getting ready for an influx of Puerto Ricans fleeing the devastation left by Hurricane Maria.  

Scott Wilderman, the CEO of Career Resources, which operates the American Jobs Center for the city, met with other city officials and community leaders on Friday to develop a transition center, where incoming families can get services. 

In the wake of Hurricane Maria, many people around Connecticut have been collecting supplies to help the relief effort in Puerto Rico. But it’s difficult to get those supplies to where they need to be, particularly to the more remote areas of the territory.

Luis Cruz and Esther Gomez had always considered moving to Florida from Puerto Rico. The weather and proximity made it an ideal destination; plus, the couple had family scattered across the state. They just didn't know when they'd take the big step.

Then Hurricane Maria hit. Three weeks after the storm wiped out the island's power grid, less than 20 percent of people have electricity and 64 percent have drinking water.

"We cannot keep FEMA, the Military & the First Responders" in Puerto Rico "forever," President Trump said Thursday, hinting at a possible limit on federal aid to the island territory where 3.4 million Americans have struggled to recover from two destructive hurricanes.

Here are the president's comments on the issue, compressed from three consecutive tweets:

Back-to-school season didn't last long this year in Puerto Rico. First Hurricane Irma and then Maria forced schools to close and turned the lives of students and their families upside down.

Puerto Rico's secretary of education, Julia Keleher, says that of the U.S. territory's 1,113 public schools, 22 reopened last week and another 145 this week. They're hoping that the majority will be open by Oct. 23. Some are still functioning as emergency shelters.

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