A student at the Ralph C. Mahar Regional School in Orange, Massachusetts, reads the names of 17 victims in last month's school shooting in Parkland, Florida. A chime was sounded after each name.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

A big story this week was the student walkouts across the region and the country, on the one-month anniversary of the high school shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Students at the Ralph C. Mahar Regional School in Orange, Massachusetts, take place in a national walkout on March 14, 2018.
Jill Kaufman / New England Public Radio

On the dot of 10 a.m., even as walkways were still being treated for ice the morning after a nor'easter, students from the Ralph C. Mahar Regional School in Orange, Massachusetts, and many teachers, took part in Wednesday's national school walkout.

School students around Connecticut joined a national school walkout in protest against gun violence Wednesday. But the way the event was handled by school administration varied widely from district to district.

High school students on Long Island and in Connecticut walked out of their classes today in solidarity with students around the country in a nationwide call for legislative action to end gun violence in schools.

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET

At South High School in Columbus, Ohio, students stepped outside in frigid weather and said 17 names, releasing a balloon for each one.

In Orange County, Fla., 17 empty desks sat in the Wekiva High School courtyard. Students sang — "Heal the world, make it a better place."

Connecticut has spent over $50 million helping schools beef up security since 2013. Some of that money -- $3.2 million -- has gone to private schools, which are reimbursed at a higher rate than many public schools.

Students will be walking out of schools across Connecticut Wednesday to express their concerns about gun violence. School districts around the state have been responding to the effort in different ways. 

Agawam High School freshman Mia Hastings, who organized the March 14, 2018, student walkout  at her school.
Courtesty / Mia Hastings

At 10 a.m. Wednesday, a month after the school shooting in Florida, thousands of students in New England will participate in a 17-minute national walkout, demanding Congress pass gun legislation.

Michael Buoniconti, superintendent of the Mohawk Trail and Hawlemont Regional School Districts, stands out side the Mohawk Trail Regional Middle and High Schools in Shelburne, Massachusetts. A video camera monitors who wants to enter the school.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

Students across the country will walk out of class Wednesday morning to mark one month since the Parkland shooting, and to call for safer schools.

In the past decade, it’s become the norm for students to practice lockdowns to protect against an intruder with a gun. Now some western Massachusetts educators say they want to do more to secure their schools.

A sign held at a Washington, DC, demonstration organized by Teens For Gun Reform, in the wake of the February 14, 2018, shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.
Lorie Shaull / Creative Commons /

It was not lost on students who attend an online public school in Massachusetts that an attack like at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last month in Parkland, Florida, could never happen to them.