TAXES

Updated at 1:26 a.m. ET Wednesday

Republicans in Congress approved a sweeping and controversial $1.5 trillion tax overhaul, with the Senate voting early Wednesday along straight party lines to move the measure forward.

On Nov. 27, the Council of Churches of Western Massachusetts hosted a summit on church security. Pictured, Assistant US Attorney Kevin O'Regan, left, talks to attendees.
Sean Teehan / NEPR

This December marked five years since the murders at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. Twenty first-graders and six adults were gunned down. 

Updated on Dec. 20 at 3:50 p.m. ET

The Republican tax bill, which Congress sent to President Trump on Wednesday, would give most Americans a tax cut next year, according to a new analysis. However, it would by far benefit the richest Americans the most. Meanwhile, many lower- and middle-class Americans would have higher taxes a decade from now ... unless a future Congress extends the cuts.

Updated on Dec. 20 at 4 p.m. ET

Congressional Republicans handed their party and the president a major legislative victory when they passed their tax cut plan.

Updated at 7:29 p.m. ET

In making his "closing argument" for tax legislation expected to get a vote in Congress next week, President Trump announced that the changes would take effect early next year.

Rep. Richard Neal, left, and Rep. Jim McGovern in file photos.
C-SPAN

Springfield Congressman Richard Neal, like many Democrats and some Republicans, has repeatedly called on President Trump to release his tax returns. 

Our weekly education news roundup is back! And what a week it was.

Higher Education Act proposals in the House

Updated Dec. 2 at 11:57 a.m. ET

The Senate narrowly approved a $1.4 trillion tax overhaul early Saturday morning following a day of procedural delays and frustration.

The legislation, which would cut the top corporate tax rate to 20 percent and lower taxes for most individuals, narrowly passed in a vote of 51-49. Tennessee Republican Bob Corker was the only Republican to vote against the legislation, joining every Democrat and both independents in opposing the sweeping overhaul of the nation's tax laws.

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Senate Republicans continued maneuvering to pass their overhaul of the nation's tax code on Friday, possibly working around concerns by stern deficit hawks after an official estimate on Thursday said that the economic growth spurred by the plan would still leave a $1 trillion hole in the deficit.

Updated Nov. 29 at 1:00 p.m. ET

Senate Republicans are moving ahead with their bill to overhaul the nation's tax code. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced there would be a vote on Wednesday afternoon to begin considering the bill on the Senate floor, a process that could take several days and involve votes on many amendments as GOP leaders work to win over some of their members who remain uncommitted on the bill.

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