TECHNOLOGY

The city of Hartford already uses a real-time acoustic device to detect the sound of gunshots as a way to help solve crimes. Now, the city wants to use it also to identify children who may need help processing the trauma from gun violence.

For a company that's all about the future of communication, Facebook is looking to the past to solve at least some of its problems.

After months of intense scrutiny over the role the company played in the 2016 presidential election, the social network giant announced it wants to use postcards to verify the identity of advertising buyers to prevent future foreign meddling.

Facebook’s plan to fight fake news may have a fatal flaw. That’s according to a Yale study on how people read and react to news on the social media platform.

If the Russian psychologist Ivan Pavlov were alive today, what would he say about smartphones? He might not think of them as phones at all, but instead as remarkable tools for understanding how technology can manipulate our brains.

UMass food scientists Lynne McLandsborough, left, and Lili He.
Karen Brown / NEPR

Food scientists at UMass Amherst have come up with a technique they say could make it a lot easier to avoid food poisoning.

In the woods.
Pxhere / Creative Commons

"You should have a cell phone," my mother-in-law says.

Connecticut is introducing electronic tablets to prisoners in state facilities this spring. Department of Correction Commissioner Scott Semple made the announcement in Hartford on Thursday.

The wheels of a tall, metal cart squeak as Chris Beatty, 26, pulls it through a maze of aisles inside a cosmetics warehouse in Burlington, N.J.

A hand-held scanner helps Beatty find specific items, such as face cream or lipstick — to be sorted, packed and shipped to online customers. In his industry, this is called picking.

Asked if a robot could do his job, Beatty responds with a long pause. "That's a tough one," he says eventually, "but I don't think a robot could do this."

"If something on their desk or in their pocket dings, rings or vibrates — they will lose focus."

"Students are doing so much in class, distraction and disruption isn't really something I worry about."

How should teachers — both K-12 and college — deal with the use of computers and phones by students in class?

On the one hand, those sleek little supercomputers promise to connect us to all human knowledge. On the other hand, they are also scientifically designed by some of the world's top geniuses to feel as compelling as oxygen.

Rick Sullivan, president and CEO of the Economic Development Council, seen in file photo, has issued the organization's support for Enfield, Conn., in its bid to become the second national headquarters for Amazon.
File photo / The Republican / MassLive.com/photos

A bid to bring Amazon's second headquarters to Enfield, Connecticut, fell short. The two-state plan was backed by Rick Sullivan, head of the Economic Development Council of Western Massachusetts.

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