VERMONT

Coverage of Vermont from New England Public Radio, NPR, and other NPR stations.

A bill that would require background checks for private gun sales in Vermont has been stuck in the Senate Judiciary Committee since last year, but the legislation could be headed for a vote on the Senate floor even without the committee’s approval.

Three colleges around Burlington report that stickers and posters promoting white nationalist views were left on their campuses. The University of Vermont, St. Michael’s College and Champlain College have denounced  the signs and removed them.

Officials in two Vermont towns hit by ice-jam flooding last month are preparing for another round of rising water levels over the next few days.

Organic dairy farmers are getting paid less because of an oversupply of their milk, a market glut that’s led one major organic buyer to delay signing on new farmers.

NPR is reporting that "a federal grand jury has indicted 13 Russians and three Russian entities in connection with the attack on the 2016 presidential election."

Included in the indictment are details of how the accused allegedly used social media to disseminate information in support of Sen. Bernie Sanders' and Donald Trump's presidential campaigns.

At first glance, the numbers look optimistic. After three years of increases in family court cases related to addiction such as child abuse and neglect, numbers were down for fiscal year 2017.

As the Winter Olympics kicks off, the U.S. Women's cross-country ski team — including those with ties to Vermont like Ida Sargent, Jessie Diggins, Liz Stephen, Sophie Caldwell, Kaitlynn Miller, and Caitlin Patterson — is favored to bring home a number of medals.

You don't have to go far to pass the torch to the next generation of great athletes in Vermont, because in the Green Mountain State, Olympic bloodlines are all in the family.

A key Vermont Senate committee has given its approval to legislation increasing the state minimum wage to $15 an hour over a 6-year period. 

A macro view of a dollar bill.
Chris Dlugosz / Creative Commons / goo.gl/gw7VDu

Todd Wallack of The Boston Globe looked at documents filed with the IRS over the past seven years, and found more than 70 examples of fraud, diversion of assets and other losses at charities in New England. 

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