Summer Fiction Series

Summertime means barbecue, beach…and New England Public Radio’s annual local fiction series. Every Friday morning, we’ll feature an interview with an author from New England who’s got a new novel out for those lazy days in the sun. As the season progresses, you can hear each interview archived here and start your summer reading list. 

Ways to Connect

Judge Michael Ponsor, holding his first novel, "The Hanging Judge," which was published in 2013.
File photo / The Republican

When Springfield federal Judge Michael Ponsor semi-retired after three decades on the bench, he started to enjoy two privileges of part time work: He could choose the type of cases he wanted, and he had a lot more time for his other professional passion, fiction writing.

James Carse, at his home in Rowe, Mass.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

The next book in our summer fiction series took Rowe, Massachusetts, author James Carse five years to create, from start "to publish."

In his whodunit novel "PhDeath: The Puzzler Murders," the perp creates puzzles, and a group of academics solves them to learn the identity of the victim.

Author Zane Kotker lives in Northampton, Mass.
Joyce Skowyra / NEPR

In Northampton, Massachusetts, writer Zane Kotker's latest book, three widows in their early 70s deal with loneliness, fear of death, a condo association and internet dating.

"Goodnight, Ladies" is a 111-page novella, and the latest pick in our summer fiction series. 

Naila Moreira
Jermane Stephinger

We continue our summer fiction series with a form of literature that is not strictly "made up." 

The next pick for our summer fiction series is a cyber-thriller replete with a steamy romance. 

"My Immaculate Assassin" is by David Huddle, a poet, fiction writer and professor who lives in Burlington, Vermont.

We begin the 2017 summer fiction series with a heartfelt look at two world religious leaders.

The author is Roland Merullo from Williamsburg, Massachusetts, and his book is "The Delight of Being Ordinary: A Road Trip with the Pope and the Dalai Lama." 

Mike Kelly, head of archives and special collections at Amherst College, reads from the Melville Dewey archive.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

Summer begins next week, and so we'll be kicking off our Summer Fiction series. That's when New England Public Radio reporters interview local authors -- some of which have written so many books they can't remember how many.